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  1. Unregistered
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    #1

    Post Use of until

    can anybody tell me how to use until ?

    thanks in advance ,

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Use of until

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    can anybody tell me how to use until ?

    thanks in advance ,
    We won't know who you are until you register.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
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      • Bulgaria
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    #3

    Re: Use of until

    I’m not a teacher.

    Hi….

    until (prep). = 1. up to the time of: We danced until dawn.
    2. before (a specified time): She can't leave until Friday.

    until (conj.)

    1. Up to the time that: We walked until it got dark.
    2. Before: You cannot leave until your work is finished.
    3. To the point or extent that: I talked until I was hoarse.

    until = up to the point when

    We use “until” or “till” to say how long a situation continues:

    “Shall we go now?” “No, let’s wait until (or till) it stops rain.”
    “I was tired this morninga so I stayed in bed until half past ten.”

    Compare until and by in these situations:

    Sue will be away until Monday. (so she’ll come back on Monday)
    Sue will be back by Monday. (= she’ll be back on or before Monday, on Monday at the latest.)

    I’ll be working until 11 o’clock. (so I’ll stop working at 11 o’clock)
    I’ll have finished my work by 11 o’clock. (= I’ll finish my work at or before 11 o’clock, at 11 o’clock at the latest)

    We cannot use “until” with this meaning:

    Tell me by Friday whether or not you can come to the party. ( not "Tell me until Friday".)

    Regards

    V.


    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 57
    #4

    Re: Use of until

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    I’m not a teacher.

    Hi….

    until (prep). = 1. up to the time of: We danced until dawn.
    2. before (a specified time): She can't leave until Friday.

    until (conj.)

    1. Up to the time that: We walked until it got dark.
    2. Before: You cannot leave until your work is finished.
    3. To the point or extent that: I talked until I was hoarse.

    until = up to the point when

    We use “until” or “till” to say how long a situation continues:

    “Shall we go now?” “No, let’s wait until (or till) it stops rain.”
    “I was tired this morninga so I stayed in bed until half past ten.”

    Compare until and by in these situations:

    Sue will be away until Monday. (so she’ll come back on Monday)
    Sue will be back by Monday. (= she’ll be back on or before Monday, on Monday at the latest.)

    I’ll be working until 11 o’clock. (so I’ll stop working at 11 o’clock)
    I’ll have finished my work by 11 o’clock. (= I’ll finish my work at or before 11 o’clock, at 11 o’clock at the latest)

    We cannot use “until” with this meaning:

    Tell me by Friday whether or not you can come to the party. ( not "Tell me until Friday".)

    Regards

    V.
    Hi Vil,

    Thanks for your detailed reply.It is of grate help to me too.

    1) Will there be any change in meaning if I replace "until" with "Till"?

    2) What is the difference between "Until" and "Till"?

    Please help me.

  3. IvanV's Avatar

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 576
    #5

    Re: Use of until

    Quote Originally Posted by hsb View Post
    Hi Vil,

    Thanks for your detailed reply. It is of great help to me too.

    1) Will there be any change in meaning if I replace "until" with "Till"?

    2) What is the difference between "Until" and "Till"?

    Please help me.
    It is somehow believed that till is a shortened form of until. It appears to be good logic, yes - but, the fact is that till is by far the older word. The main difference in ''contemporary English'' is that until is given a slightly more formal tone. And it is more likely to appear at the beginning of a sentence. Anyway, till is perfectly good English, and the choice of whether to use till or until is often decided by the rhythm of the sentence.

    Additionally, 'til has been created, presumably by the people who considered till an abbreviation from until. Even though that is not correct, 'til has it's everyday usage and place in ''good English'', but only when it is preceded by an apostrophe denoting that lack of letter U.

    (shop ’til you drop, as it's written in some newspaper right beside me)

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