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    #1

    Grammar

    A,'He didn't show up at the last night party'.
    B, 'Well, he used to be a funny guy.'

    In this case, can I say " he was a funny guy'?

    We are family now.
    We are a family now.

    Both sentences are right?

    Please.


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    #2

    Re: Grammar

    #1 You can, but it will not indicate the same thing.

    He used to be something = at one time [indefinite] he was something

    He was something = At that time [definite] he was something.

    #2 - the first is a general statement; the second is a specific statement.

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    #3

    Re: Grammar

    A,' He talked much at the party last night.'
    B,' He was/is always like that.'

    A,' He didn't talk much at the party last night.'
    B,' Really? he always talked/talks much at the party.'

    All answers are correct? Please.


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    #4

    Re: Grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by puzzle View Post
    A,' He talked much a lot at the party last night.'
    B,' He was/is always like that.' Both can be used.

    A,' He didn't talk much at the party last night.'
    B,' Really? He always talked/talks much a lot at the party.' He usually talks a lot at a party

    All answers are correct? Please.
    .

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    #5

    Re: Grammar

    A,' He didn't talk much at the party last night.'
    B,' Really? He always talked/talks much a lot at the party.' He usually talks a lot at a party

    I.Can I say,' He usually talked a lot at a party.'?

    II.A,' Please come home at ten.'
    B,' You know I always come / came home early.' Both can be used? Please.

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    #6

    Re: Grammar

    When you talk about 'always' and usually', the present tense is normally used. Especially in this case when something was said only the night before.

    He usually talked a lot at a party. - Possible if you are referring to a period in the past.

    'You know I always come home early.' - present tense is more appropriate but 'came' is still possible.

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    #7

    Re: Grammar

    He usually talked a lot at a party. - Possible if you are referring to a period in the past.

    You mean it is wrong to use "talked" here?


    'I am glad you could come.'
    'I was glad you could come.'

    I heard the second sentence from an American movie which I forgot the movie name. I am sure the hostess uses "was" not "am" when she finds the vistor she is looking forward to seeing. Why?

    Please.

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    #8

    Re: Grammar

    You mean it is wrong to use "talked" here?
    It is not wrong, it is possible as I said, but not common.


    'I am glad you could come.'
    'I was glad you could come.'
    The 2nd sentence is used to refer to an event in the past.

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    #9

    Re: Grammar

    'I am glad you could come.'
    'I was glad you could come.' The 2nd sentence is used to refer to an event in the past.

    Sorry, I still can't catch your meaning. That the hostess finds the vistor is not an event happened in the past, but an event happened in the present. For example: I go to the party you are holding, when you see me, you say," I was glad you could come.' to me?


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    #10

    Re: Grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by puzzle View Post
    'I am glad you could come.'
    'I was glad you could come.' The 2nd sentence is used to refer to an event in the past.

    Sorry, I still can't catch your meaning. That the hostess finds the vistor is not an event happened in the past, but an event happened in the present. For example: I go to the party you are holding, when you see me, you say," I was glad you could come.' to me?
    You would say "I am glad you could come". It is a statement of present feeling.

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