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    #1

    take an exceptoin to

    Dear Teachers,

    I read this from Oscar Wilde and the Candlelight Murders by Gyles Brandreth:

    "This was the year that my first marriage ended; my wife Marthe had taken an exception to my friend Kaitlyn - and now Kaitlyn had run off to Vienna!"

    Does "take an exceptoin to" mean "have an affair with"? Is it a sommon way to address what it implies?

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    #2

    Re: take an exceptoin to

    'To take exception to' is a formal way of saying 'to object strongly'.
    You can check out the meanings of such idioms in any of the dictionary/idiom sites.

    not a teacher


    • Join Date: Jul 2008
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    #3

    Re: take an exceptoin to

    It means she didn't like her much!

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    #4

    Re: take an exceptoin to

    So... is it saying that he got divorced because his wife didn't like his friend?

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    #5

    Re: take an exceptoin to

    Quote Originally Posted by Eway View Post
    So... is it saying that he got divorced because his wife didn't like his friend?
    The implication is that Kaitlyn was more than a friend. He was having an affair with Kaitlin. The way the sentence is written is meant to be ironic. The way you have read it is the way the hero (but not the author) wants it to be seen (he is the good guy; it wasn't his fault).
    That's my understanding from the short excerpt, anyway.

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    #6

    Re: take an exceptoin to

    I’m not a teacher.

    Hi Eway,

    take exception to = provoke general disapproval, raise objections to,
    take exception at = take offence, be/feel hurt

    Regards

    V.
    Last edited by vil; 18-Jul-2008 at 08:41.

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