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  1. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #1

    Smile a baby [which] has recently been born

    arrival noun

    2 [C] INFORMAL a baby which has recently been born:
    Their new arrival was keeping them busy.
    Hi! The quoted above is an excerpt from Cambridge Dictionaries Online.

    Q1: Why does the editor use "which" rather than "who" or "that". "which" is applied to an article. Right?

    Q2: Can I use "who" or "that" to replace "which" in the context"? If no, why?

    Thank you!

  2. Soup's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: a baby [which] has recently been born

    Take a look here, first, Who vs. Which vs. That | Grammar Rules.

  3. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #3

    Smile Re: a baby [which] has recently been born

    Hi Soup,

    Thanks for the link. But according to its Rule 1 states, a baby is a person, isn't it? So why did the author use 'which'?

    Rule 1.Who refers to people. That and which refer to groups or things.

  4. Soup's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: a baby [which] has recently been born

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    Hi Soup,

    Thanks for the link. But according to its Rule 1 states, a baby is a person, isn't it? So why did the author use 'which'?

    Rule 1.Who refers to people. That and which refer to groups or things.
    OK. Now that we have the basics out of the way, let's go on:
    Some people extend the rule and insist that, just as that should be used only in restrictive clauses, which should be used only in nonrestrictive clauses. By this thinking, you should avoid using which in sentences such as I need a book which will tell me all about city gardening, where the restrictive clause which will tell me all about city gardening describes what sort of book is needed. But this use of which with restrictive clauses is very common, even in edited prose. If you fail to follow the rule in this point, you have plenty of company. Moreover, there are some situations in which which is preferable to that. Which can be especially useful where two or more relative clauses are joined by and or or: It is a philosophy in which ordinary people may find solace and which many have found reason to praise. You may also want to use which to introduce a restrictive clause when the preceding phrase contains a that: We want to assign only that book which will be most helpful.

    that instead of who. The man that wanted to talk to you just called back. Some people say that you can only use who and not that to introduce a restrictive relative clause that identifies a person. But that has been used in this way for centuries. It is a quintessential English usage, going back to the Old English period, and has been used by our best writers. So it is entirely acceptable to write either the man that wanted to talk to you or the man who wanted to talk to you.

    Read more here http://www.bartleby.com/64/C001/062.html


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    #5

    Re: a baby [which] has recently been born

    The girl that I marry will have to be...
    7 Brides for 7 Brothers.

    The Man That Got Away.
    Judy Garland

  5. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #6

    Smile Re: a baby [which] has recently been born

    Hi Soup, thank you very much for your responses again and again. Good night.

  6. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #7

    Smile Re: a baby [which] has recently been born

    Hi David L.,

    Thanks for your response. I'd like to sleep it on. I am too sleepy now. Bye bye. :)

  7. Soup's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: a baby [which] has recently been born

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    Hi Soup, thank you very much for your responses again and again. Good night.
    You're most welcome.

    Note that, choosing between who and restrictive that/which has something, perhaps a lot, to do with objectivity vs subjectivity. That is, the dictionary provides a definition in the form of objective "a baby which is ...", rather than the subjective, "a baby who is ...".

    Hope that helps.

  8. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #9

    Smile Re: a baby [which] has recently been born

    Hi Soup,

    You are helpful. Thank you!

  9. Raymott's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: a baby [which] has recently been born

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    Rule 1.Who refers to people. That and which refer to groups or things.
    There is also the fact that a baby is occasionally referred to as "it", which naturally we don't use for with people.
    Mum: The baby's crying again.
    Dad: It must be time to feed it again.
    This is becoming less common since people are realising that children are people in their own right; but you'll still hear it.
    It might have some influence on why the dictionary uses "which".

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