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    • Join Date: Jun 2008
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    #1

    Question [Help!!] not both / any

    A: Did you read the two short stories I left on your desk?
    B: I ________ of them, but I heard that they are very interesting.

    (a) have read either
    (b) have read none
    (c) haven't read both
    (d) haven't read any

    Is the answer (c) or (d)? Please explain the reason as well.

    Thank you in advance so much!


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
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    #2

    Re: [Help!!] not both / any

    (c) 'I haven't read both' implies he has read one of them. He therefore knows himself whether that story was interesting or not. Yet the speaker goes on, 'but I heard that they are very interesting." This implies he is having to rely on the opinion of others about both stories, when in fact he is supposed to have read one of them himself ...so (c) does not fit the meaning of the sentence.
    (d) he hasn't read either of the stories, and is quoting what he has heard -'they are (both) interesting'

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    #3

    Re: [Help!!] not both / any

    Quote Originally Posted by Carameldiaz View Post
    A: Did you read the two short stories I left on your desk?
    B: I ________ of them, but I heard that they are very interesting.

    (a) have read either
    (b) have read none
    (c) haven't read both
    (d) haven't read any

    Is the answer (c) or (d)? Please explain the reason as well.

    Thank you in advance so much!

    (d), we use "any" in negative sentences and "both" in positive sentences.

    (Please note I am not a teacher nor a native speaker.)

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    #4

    Re: [Help!!] not both / any

    Carameldiaz, note that, in the dialogue below, any means more than two.
    A: Did you read the two short stories I left on your desk?
    B: I haven't read any of [the short stories that were left on my desk, including the two you left], but I heard that they are very interesting.

    (a) have read either
    (b) have read none
    (c) haven't read both
    (d) haven't read any
    If B is referring to A's two short stories only, then the best choice would be,
    (e) I haven't read either of them.


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