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  1. Graver's Avatar
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    #1

    "I was a going concern"

    Hi guys!
    I need your help again :)
    I recently came across this expression in a book entitled "Night without end" by Alistair MacLean and have a vague idea of what it means. I can somehow (subconsciously) conjecture the meaning from the context the phrase was used in but just to be on the safe side, I'd like to get some confirmation from people who know English better than I do.

    My two suggestions are:

    "I was worried"
    OR
    "I was troublesome (when I was a little kid e.g.)"

    Thanks in advance
    Graver

  2. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "I was a going concern"

    Quote Originally Posted by Graver View Post
    Hi guys!
    I need your help again :)
    I recently came across this expression in a book entitled "Night without end" by Alistair MacLean and have a vague idea of what it means. I can somehow (subconsciously) conjecture the meaning from the context the phrase was used in but just to be on the safe side, I'd like to get some confirmation from people who know English better than I do.

    My two suggestions are:

    "I was worried"
    OR
    "I was troublesome (when I was a little kid e.g.)"

    Thanks in advance
    Graver
    Hi, Graver!

    It is used to mean 'successful business.'
    going concern definition - Dictionary - MSN Encarta

    So...I guess it is used figuratively...in the book you have.

    I'm sorry I can't be of any help to you..
    Please wait for the native speakers to respond.


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    #3

    Re: "I was a going concern"

    Quote Originally Posted by Graver View Post
    Hi guys!
    I need your help again :)
    I recently came across this expression in a book entitled "Night without end" by Alistair MacLean and have a vague idea of what it means.

    Thanks in advance
    Graver

    Please provide the context - the full sentence and what goes before it. Without that we are scrabbling around in the dark.

  3. philadelphia's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "I was a going concern"

    I read some stories of Charles Dickens' and he does use forms like I was a going as being merely I was going. A sort of speaking that is brought in these stories.

    Not a teacher at all.

  4. Graver's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "I was a going concern"

    here's the context:
    "My heart was still pounding, the hairs still stiff on the back of my neck, but I was a going concern again, my mind beginning to race under the impetus invariably provided by the need for self-preservation."


  5. Graver's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: "I was a going concern"

    Quote Originally Posted by tzfujimino View Post
    Hi, Graver!

    It is used to mean 'successful business.'
    going concern definition - Dictionary - MSN Encarta

    So...I guess it is used figuratively...in the book you have.

    I'm sorry I can't be of any help to you..
    Please wait for the native speakers to respond.
    Thanks for your help anyway tzfujimino!

    I really appreciate it :)

  6. philadelphia's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: "I was a going concern"

    Maybe that may seem simple but what about I was a going concern again meaning closely I was going [to be] concern again?

  7. Senior Member
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    #8

    Re: "I was a going concern"

    Quote Originally Posted by philadelphia View Post
    I read some stories of Charles Dickens' and he does use forms had used forms like such as I was a going as being merely I was going. A sort of speaking that is brought in these stories.

    Not a teacher at all. Neither I am. I am sorry if I haven't made the right corrections.
    Mr. Charles Dickens had mostly been writing his novels from 1825 to 1870.
    He had written Oliver Twist in 1835, I think.


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    #9

    Re: "I was a going concern"

    Quote Originally Posted by Graver View Post
    here's the context:
    "My heart was still pounding, the hairs still stiff on the back of my neck, but I was a going concern again, my mind beginning to race under the impetus invariably provided by the need for self-preservation."

    The speaker has probably just been beaten up or been restrained in some way and has got free. So:

    I was in business [metaphorically] again = I was effective once more.

  8. Graver's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: "I was a going concern"

    This makes it a lot clearer now

    Thanks

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