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  1. Willsie
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    #1

    Question Verb to have

    I have a sentence that I am trying to work out what tense it is in and getting really confused. The sentence is - I have my hair cut in the centre of town. I think it is a Present Simple as it is an action the carries on but have no timeline as to when it started or when it will complete - an ongoing action. BUT...I just get the feeling that because it is ongoing it should be some kind of continuous tense. Can some one help please?

    Thanks

    Willsie

  2. Soup's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Verb to have

    It's a causative verb; e.g. I have (someone) cut my hair in the center of town.

    Learn more here English Grammar - Causative have

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Verb to have

    Quote Originally Posted by Willsie View Post
    I have a sentence that I am trying to work out what tense it is in and getting really confused. The sentence is - I have my hair cut in the centre of town. I think it is a Present Simple as it is an action the carries on but have no timeline as to when it started or when it will complete - an ongoing action. BUT...I just get the feeling that because it is ongoing it should be some kind of continuous tense. Can some one help please?

    Thanks

    Willsie
    It's in the present tense. "I have" is the clue. The tense comes from the form of the verb, not from the meaning; for example:
    "I start school tomorrow" is in the present tense even though it is used for a future event.


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    #4

    Re: Verb to have

    Thanks so much for the response. So it's a Present Tense sentence then and I'm assuing that it is Present Perfect due to the fact that it is a habitual action that happens on a regular basis. Am I right in my assumption?

  4. Soup's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Verb to have

    You're most welcome.

    Quote Originally Posted by Willsie View Post
    So it's a Present Tense sentence then and I'm assuming that it is Present Perfect ...
    Note that, the present perfect is made up of two verbs HAVE + a past participle, and that that pair cannot be separated by a noun; i.e., my hair, as it is here:

    Present
    I have my hair cut (by someone) in the centre of town.
    Variation
    I have someone cut my hair in the centre of town.

    Past
    I had my hair cut (by someone) in the centre of town.
    Variation
    I had someone cut my hair in the centre of town.
    In other words, the following two phrases do not house a present perfect verb:
    have my hair cut
    have someone cut my hair
    They are made up of the causative verb have and the bare infinitive verb cut. For example,
    Ex: I had the students erase the board.
    Ex: I have the students erase the board every afternoon. <expresses a routine; habit>
    Note, the past participle of the verb erase is erased, with a -d.
    Ex: I have the students erased the board every afternoon.
    Back to your example sentence, the verb cut is a bare infinitive:
    Ex: I have my hair cut in the centre of town.

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Verb to have

    Quote Originally Posted by Willsie View Post
    Thanks so much for the response. So it's a Present Tense sentence then and I'm assuing that it is Present Perfect
    You're welcome.
    No, "the present tense" means the simple present, not the present perfect.


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    #7

    Re: Verb to have

    Raymott and Soup - thanks so much for taking the time to explain to me. I think I'm being a bit slow here because I'm still not sure what tense it is. I think it is Present Simple but from my understanding, Raymott you said No and Soup you said it was not a Present Perfect. If it is neither of these then I am really confused. I understand it isn't a past tense because the action still happens hence why I thought it was present simple. Can you let me know which tense it is please - many thanks and I do really appreciate the time you have taken.

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    #8

    Re: Verb to have

    A learner

    I am going to kill some of my time trying to participate in solving the problem about your hair. Problems with the verb to have are not going to be solved out ever, I think. Please do not understand my work in the blue down there like teacher's correcting your sentences. I am just going to say how I'd have written the sentences if I, by any chances, were you. So let me tell you how I see the matter and how I would like to speak the language but here in Bosnia.

    Quote Originally Posted by Willsie View Post
    Raymott and Soup - thanks so much for taking making the time to explain the matter to me. I think I'm being taking this a bit slow here in because I'm still not sure what about the tenses it is. I think it is the Ppresent Ssimple but from as to my understanding, Raymott, you said No and Soup, you said it was not a the Ppresent Pperfect. If it is neither of these, then I am really confused. I understand it isn't a the simple past tense because the action is still happens happening, hence why I thought it was the present simple. Can Would you let me know which tense it is it, please - many thanks and I do really (do for the emphasis is quite enough) appreciate the time you have taken been making for me.

    I would like to continue if I haven't gotten on your wick?
    Who knows, this, at last, might turn out as a dim of a help?

    You: I've got my hair cut.

    I've got ~ be sure this is the present perfect aspect of the main verb to get. To have is an auxiliary verb here.
    my hair cut ~ the passive voice, I think

    Me: That so. You've got your hair cut. Nice.

    I am not interested in either who did it or both when exactly*in the past and where. Neither, have you told it to me. And you couldn't have used the present perfect aspect if you wanted to say who either did it or when exactly* in the past it was done or where. Either of these three in bold would ask you to use the simple past with any of them.

    You: I got my hair cut in the centre of the town.

    I got ~ the simple past aspect of the main verb to get
    my hair cut ~ the passive voice, I think.
    in the centre of the town ~ adverb of place which confirms the action's completely definite in the past.

    Me: Where exactly? I would like to get my hair cut there as well.

    You: I got my hair cut by my girl friend.
    Me: Oh, I must ask mine to do the same to my hair.

    You: I got my hair cut a minute ago. Do you like it?

    Me: Perfect!


    In addition

    You: I've had my hair cut.
    *
    You: I had my hair cut yesterday.

    Me: I see.


    Finally

    You: I've had a bath.
    *
    You: I had a bath half an hour ago.
    Me: Nice.


    You: I've got a bath.
    Me: Oh!

    Finally I would like to remind you I am a learner and not, by any chances,..

    So do not take all of this either seriously or by any chances to your heart in if there is no any bottle of good red wine with ya in case...

    As to me (please do not tell to my mom) I had a few small glasses of my strong plum brandy, which I had made last year, before now I started to write down the keyboard but this time only.
    Last edited by e2e4; 25-Jul-2008 at 17:37.

  7. Raymott's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Verb to have

    Quote Originally Posted by Willsie View Post
    Raymott and Soup - thanks so much for taking the time to explain to me. I think I'm being a bit slow here because I'm still not sure what tense it is. I think it is Present Simple but from my understanding, Raymott you said No and Soup you said it was not a Present Perfect. If it is neither of these then I am really confused. I understand it isn't a past tense because the action still happens hence why I thought it was present simple. Can you let me know which tense it is please - many thanks and I do really appreciate the time you have taken.
    It's the simple present tense.

    In my previous posts, I wrote:
    1. It's in the present tense. and
    2. No, "the present tense" means the simple present, not the present perfect.

  8. Raymott's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Verb to have

    Quote Originally Posted by e2e4 View Post
    Raymott and Soup - thanks so much for taking making the time to explain the matter to me. I think I'm being taking this a bit slow here in because I'm still not sure what about the tenses it is. I think it is the Ppresent Ssimple but from as to my understanding, Raymott, you said No and Soup, you said it was not a the Ppresent Pperfect. If it is neither of these, then I am really confused. I understand it isn't a the simple past tense because the action is still happens happening, hence why I thought it was the present simple. Can Would you let me know which tense it is it, please - many thanks and I do really (do for the emphasis is quite enough) appreciate the time you have taken been making for me.
    Why do you do this, e2e4? 80% of your "corrections" are wrong, and the rest are trivial. Willsie's first language is English. Perhaps he or she will be able to help you with your English?
    Ciao.

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