Results 1 to 7 of 7
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 75
    #1

    across from

    God Bless!

    When we use across and when we use across from?

    Is it true to use "across from" as a preposition?
    Longman dictionary has written an example for "across from" as an adverb:

    a woman sitting across from me on the train


    Thanks!
    Last edited by PCGames; 22-Jul-2008 at 13:41.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Oriya
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 2,121
    #2

    Exclamation Re: across from

    Quote Originally Posted by PCGames View Post
    God Bless!

    When we use across and when we across from?

    Is it true to use "across from" as a preposition?
    Longman dictionary has written an example for "across from" as an adverb:

    a woman sitting across from me on the train


    Thanks!
    'Across' can be used as a preposition as well as an adverb.
    Examples: I came across this shirt while I was looking for a pair of jeans. (Prep)
    We swam across the lake to reach the island.(Adv)

    However 'across from' can be used as an adverb. I have not come across any text where the combination is used as preposition.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,091
    #3

    Re: across from

    Quote Originally Posted by PCGames View Post
    God Bless!

    When we use across and when we across from?

    Is it true to use "across from" as a preposition?
    Longman dictionary has written an example for "across from" as an adverb:

    a woman sitting across from me on the train

    Thanks!
    They can both be used as prepositions. Try to think of them as separate words, not a combination.
    "I walked across the bridge" (across is a preposition)
    "He lived across the bridge from my house" (both prepositions)
    "He lived across from my house". (from is a preposition, and "across" is an adverb ).
    "across from" can't be an adverb since it's two words. It could be an adverbial phrase. But I wouldn't call it that here.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,091
    #4

    Re: across from

    Quote Originally Posted by Manas Ranjan Mallick View Post
    We swam across the lake to reach the island.(Adv)
    I'd call this a preposition and "across the lake" an adverbial phrase of time.
    "There was lake between us and the island, so we swam across" This is a better example of "across" being an adverb.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Oriya
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 2,121
    #5

    Exclamation Re: across from

    Thank you Raymott. I agree with you.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 524
    #6

    Re: across from

    Hello,

    I'd call this a preposition and "across the lake" an adverbial phrase of time.
    Raymott, did you mean adverbial phrase of place ? If not, could you explain a bit more about it?

    "He lived across from my house". (from is a preposition, and "across" is an adverb ).
    Does across from indicate across something, street in the case or passage in the example with a train ?
    Can we assume that he lived across the street not exactly opposit me?

    Cheers,
    Coud you amend my post ?

  3. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,091
    #7

    Re: across from

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaskin View Post
    Hello,

    Raymott, did you mean adverbial phrase of place ? If not, could you explain a bit more about it?
    Yes, sorry. Thanks for picking that up.

    Does across from indicate across something, street in the case or passage in the example with a train ?
    Yes, "across from" implies "across from something"

    Can we assume that he lived across the street not exactly opposite me?
    He doesn't have to live exactly opposite in order to live across the street. It's not a very specific term. I'd expect him to live somewhere in the same or next block to be able to say that.

    Cheers,
    Coud you amend my post ?
    Above in blue

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •