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  1. Bushwhacker's Avatar
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    #1

    Cool Fill in the jokes

    Following paragraph is not quite clear in its meaning for me:

    “I enjoyed all the AIRPORT movies back in the ‘70s. Even though I enjoyed them, when those characters like Robert Stack or Peter Graves or Charlton Heston would say serious lines, as an audience you’re filling in the jokes.”

    Please, does it mean that despite the fact that those characters can talk seriously, you are tempted to turn their lines into a joke, something like you finishing their lines in a humorous manner, or thinking they are humorous even when not intended?

    Thank You for your help

  2. Amigos4's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Fill in the jokes

    Quote Originally Posted by Bushwhacker View Post
    Following paragraph is not quite clear in its meaning for me:

    “I enjoyed all the AIRPORT movies back in the ‘70s. Even though I enjoyed them, when those characters like Robert Stack or Peter Graves or Charlton Heston would say serious lines, as an audience you’re filling in the jokes.”

    Please, does it mean that despite the fact that those characters can talk seriously, you are tempted to turn their lines into a joke, something like you finishing their lines in a humorous manner, or thinking they are humorous even when not intended?

    Thank You for your help
    Please, does it mean that despite the fact that those characters can talk seriously, you are tempted to turn their lines into a joke, something like you finishing their lines in a humorous manner, or thinking they are humorous even when not intended?

    Yes! That is exactly what it means to 'fill in the jokes'.

    Think of some of the more famous comedic times such as Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis, or Abbott and Costello. One of the team members would be the 'straight man' and he would deliver the serious line. The other member of the team would provide (fill in) the punchline.

    In the Airport films, Robert Stack, Peter Graves, and Charlton Heston would be the straightmen and the audience was left to fill in the punchlines, if they wished.

    Cheers,
    Amigo

  3. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Fill in the jokes

    Quote Originally Posted by Bushwhacker View Post
    Following paragraph is not quite clear in its meaning for me:

    “I enjoyed all the AIRPORT movies back in the ‘70s. Even though I enjoyed them, when those characters like Robert Stack or Peter Graves or Charlton Heston would say serious lines, as an audience you’re filling in the jokes.”

    Please, does it mean that despite the fact that those characters can talk seriously, you are tempted to turn their lines into a joke, something like you finishing their lines in a humorous manner, or thinking they are humorous even when not intended?

    Thank You for your help
    Yes. They delivered their lines in a very straight-forward, serious manner, and it was left to the audience to mentally translate the joke and then laugh.

    For example, Peter Graves as the pilot was chatting with a young boy (who was an airplane enthusiast) that was brought into the cockpit to observe the operations. Graves, with a straight face and in all seriousness, asked the boy at one point "Have you ever seen a grown man naked?" The audience correctly interpreted him to be some sort of pervert and laughed, even though the line wasn't "set up" as a joke with a corresponding punch line.

    Another part of the humor in the film was that Robert Stack, Peter Graves and Leslie Nielson were known as serious, dramatic actors. None had any sort of background in comedy. So it made it doubly humorous to hear strait-laced Robert Stack (whom most Americans knew as Eliot Ness from TV's Untouchables) describe flying an airplane as "It's just like riding a bicycle, except it's a lot harder to put baseball cards in the spokes."

  4. RonBee's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Fill in the jokes

    Pilot to copilot: Surely you must be joking.
    Copilot to pilot: I'm not joking, and don't call me Shirley.



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