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  1. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #1

    Smile Re: color application

    For example, purple use to be associated with solely belonging to royalty. This PowerPoint could now be beheaded if it weren’t made by the King or Queen


    Hello! What does the sentences I quote mean? An common people cannot use purple color in writing, can s/he?

    Thank you!

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    #2

    Re: color application

    For example, purple used to be associated with/solely belonging to (use either phrase)the royalty.

    This PowerPoint (? Microsoft software?) could now be beheaded if it(what?) weren’t made by(for?) the King or Queen.

    not a teacher

  2. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #3

    Smile Re: color application

    Morning Tedtmc,

    Thank you for your reply. I am reading an instruction about colors in PowerPoint format, which was made by experts of native English speakers.

    Well, I agree with you that the sentences sound grammatically wrong.

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    #4

    Re: color application

    It's not wrong . . . it's a joke!

    Because purple was to be used solely for royalty, to use it in a powerpoint presentation might cause someone to be beheaded.

    (In other words, don't use purple in powerpoint presentations.)

  3. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #5

    Smile Re: color application

    purple use to be associated with solely belonging to royalty.
    Hello Susiedqq:

    Thank you for your response. I refer to this as above is grammatically wrong as Tedtmc revised in bold.

    purple used to be associated with/solely belonging to (use either phrase)the royalty.
    What do you think about this? Thanks!


  4. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: color application

    Quote Originally Posted by susiedqq View Post
    It's not wrong . . . it's a joke!


    (In other words, don't use purple in powerpoint presentations.)
    It is true as the author comments? If I write my words in purple here, is it offensive?

    e.g. Hi Susiedqq...


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    #7

    Re: color application

    Naah!

    However, purple is a recessive colour and can be difficult to read. Better not to use it!

  5. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #8

    Smile Re: color application

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    Naah!

    However, purple is a recessive colour and can be difficult to read. Better not to use it!
    Anglika, thank you again.

  6. Soup's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: color application

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post

    Hello! What does the sentences I quoted mean? Common people cannot use the color purple in writing, can they?

    Thank you!
    Unfortunately, I don't share the same reading as the other posters. In looking at the grammar, it's OK, except for use to, which should be used to as tedtmc correctly points out:
    For example, purple use[d] to be associated with solely belonging to royalty. This PowerPoint could now be beheaded if it weren’t made by the King or Queen
    The phrase associated with belonging to royalty is fine, even with the added adverb solely, but it is quite the mouthful, isn't it? The noun royalty, by the way, doesn't require a determiner in that context, and adding one would render the phrase ungrammatical, as no one particulary group of royals is being referred to.

    As for the meaning of the quotation and its pragmatics, I'm not all that sure what it is supposed to say, to be honest, as there isn't enough context to say one way or the other whether the author thinks purple should or shouldn't be used in ppts. I have created a great deal of ppts in my day and this is the first time I've heard that purple shouldn't be used. If that's true, that's fine, but opinions seem to be divided:
    You are about to present a new product or discuss the unique technique don’t hesitate to use purple. This color will put some mystery and sophistication into your presentation.
    iSpring Blog » PowerPoint

    Save purple for lighter topics.
    http://www.waynesboro.k12.va.us/whs/...t#311,21,Other color information…
    In short, and to answer your question, anybody can use purple ink in writing; it's not common though and would be viewed as artistic in some circles, and odd in others, especially in day-to-day transactional Business English; but that's in writing letters and email(s), not in ppt fonts.

    As for the meaning of the quotation, more context is needed for me to fully understand the point the author is making. As it reads, purple was a color associated only with Kings and Queens. If commoners wore it, they were beheaded. That, however, was a long, long, long time ago. Today, purple is a "common" color, and like love its meaning is in the eye of the beholder. Which is why I can't quite get why the author of the article on powerpoint colors would suggest not using purple, if s/he even says that at all. (It's fab with white font, by the way , but if purple is a no-no, I'd like to know the reason, just as a matter of interest and nothing more.)

  7. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #10

    Smile Re: color application

    Hi Soup,

    Thank you for taking time to reply in detail as well as correct the errors in my writing. Here are more contexts.



    Color and Cultural Association


    It’s an important to remember that these color associations do not come from the color itself. Without us to interpret it, red is simply light and doesn’t need an interpretive characteristic.

    Because these associations depend on us, they can differ from culture to culture, and they can also change over time.

    For example, purple use to be associated with solely belonging to royalty. This PowerPoint could now be beheaded if it weren’t made by the King or Queen!

    [/font]

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