Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. Cyproject
    Guest
    #1

    Question With or without "with" - Canadian English / U.S. English

    Hello,

    An American friend and a Canadian friend recently argued about which of the following two sentences is 'technically' correct:

    Canadian: "I hope you're done the project."
    American: "I hope you're done with the project."

    My fellow American and I believed that leaving out 'with' couldn't possibly be correct and decided that the Canadian supported sentence must actually be some sort of colloquialism. We asked several other Canadians which sentence they thought was correct and they unanimously picked "I hope you're done the project." We were shocked. One of the Canadians that we asked suggested that using 'with' in our example sentence was "a southern thing."

    So, here is the question: Is leaving out 'with' grammatically correct? If so, which would be the preferred sentence structure for formal writing (technical reports, business correspondence, journalism, et cetera)?

    Thanks for any information that you can offer,
    Thomas

  2. Amigos4's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 54,947
    #2

    Re: With or without "with" - Canadian English / U.S. English

    Quote Originally Posted by Cyproject View Post
    Hello,

    An American friend and a Canadian friend recently argued about which of the following two sentences is 'technically' correct:

    Canadian: "I hope you're done the project."
    American: "I hope you're done with the project."

    My fellow American and I believed that leaving out 'with' couldn't possibly be correct and decided that the Canadian supported sentence must actually be some sort of colloquialism. We asked several other Canadians which sentence they thought was correct and they unanimously picked "I hope you're done the project." We were shocked. One of the Canadians that we asked suggested that using 'with' in our example sentence was "a southern thing."

    So, here is the question: Is leaving out 'with' grammatically correct? If so, which would be the preferred sentence structure for formal writing (technical reports, business correspondence, journalism, et cetera)?

    Thanks for any information that you can offer,
    Thomas
    Hi, Thomas!

    "I hope you're done with the project" is definitely common usage in the US. Leaving 'with' out would be a major grammatical error.

    Having traveled extensively in Canada as a tourist, I can't imagine that our good neighbors to the north would leave the word 'with' out of the sentence. I eagerly await a response from our Canadian friends!

    Cheers,
    Amigo


    • Join Date: Aug 2003
    • Posts: 70
    #3

    Re: With or without "with" - Canadian English / U.S. English

    Have to agree. Sounds and is totally wrong grammatically. However, many communities appear to have errors in their modern day speech and are either oblivious to it or use it as some sort of badge!

    One that springs to mind is the gang infested hoods of parts of LA etc.

Similar Threads

  1. Composition - pls. look through for mistakes
    By popsie in forum Editing & Writing Topics
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 24-Feb-2008, 23:12
  2. May you help me edit my first essay, please?
    By nongporz in forum Editing & Writing Topics
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 26-Jul-2007, 12:12
  3. Why I learn English the language I hate
    By zhengrong in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 43
    Last Post: 22-Jul-2007, 22:30
  4. [feeling] Annoying English?!
    By Wai_Wai in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 13-Nov-2006, 09:59
  5. Is it right?
    By Genrikh in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 03-Dec-2005, 16:59

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •