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    • Join Date: Jul 2008
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    #1

    "without my host, they proved but so so,"

    What is the meaning of this phrase "without my host, they proved but so so"?

    In 1774, the Rev. John Newton comments on his previous attempt to keep track of the attendance in his congregation. He wrote:
    "I was as busy as a cackling hen, in counting them up. But with regard to some I have reckoned as the saying is 'without my host, they proved but so so,' and I have had but few to count for this twelve month past."


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #2

    Re: "without my host, they proved but so so,"

    Quote Originally Posted by ggordon View Post
    What is the meaning of this phrase "without my host, they proved but so so"?

    In 1774, the Rev. John Newton comments on his previous attempt to keep track of the attendance in his congregation. He wrote:
    "I was as busy as a cackling hen, in counting them up. But with regard to some I have reckoned as the saying is 'without my host, they proved but so so,' and I have had but few to count for this twelve month past."
    Host = host of people = his congregation

    so-so - iffy, neither good nor bad in quality.

    Some of his congregation are not regular in coming to church, so he cannot count on them when assessing attendance.

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