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    #1

    sentence

    Shall I call you a cab?

    Is the sentence right? If so, doesn't 'call sb sth' mean 'name sb sth' ?
    Please.


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    #2

    Re: sentence

    There is, "What are they going to call/name their new baby?"

    and there is 'call' = ring on the telephone.
    "Give me a call sometime" does not mean 'shout out' next time you see me on the street, but ring me up on the telephone sometime.

    So, to 'call somebody a cab' means to ring up the cab company and order a taxi.

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    #3

    Re: sentence

    I want name you a star.

    Is the sentence right? Does it mean "name a star after sb"? Please.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by puzzle View Post
    I want name you a star.

    Is the sentence right? Does it mean "name a star after sb"? Please.
    Try "I want to name a star for you."

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    #5

    Re: sentence

    Try "I want to name a star for you."

    Does it mean:I want to name a star after your name? Please.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by puzzle View Post
    Try "I want to name a star for you."

    Does it mean:I want to name a star after your name? Please.
    Yes it does, if you want, you could say "I want to name a star after you." instead.


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    #7

    Re: sentence

    Try "I want to name a star for you."
    Hey, bhaisahab, you've just robbed me of immortality.
    If puzzle is going to name a star 'for me', he is going to do it on my behalf. Perhaps, as a scientist, I was going to make an official speech to name a new star we had discovered, that we have named Androcos 10, and going to announce the discovery and our name for it to the world. I can't make the ceremony because I am ill, so puzzle is going to make the announcement 'for me'.

    Whereas, puzzle wants to name a star 'after me'. - 'DavidL', in the Andromedia Xerxes quadrant of Ursula Minor.

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    #8

    Re: sentence

    puzzle, a friendly note:
    Try to avoid using 'sb', 'sth', etc. in your writing.

  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    Try "I want to name a star for you."
    Hey, bhaisahab, you've just robbed me of immortality.
    If puzzle is going to name a star 'for me', he is going to do it on my behalf. Perhaps, as a scientist, I was going to make an official speech to name a new star we had discovered, that we have named Androcos 10, and going to announce the discovery and our name for it to the world. I can't make the ceremony because I am ill, so puzzle is going to make the announcement 'for me'.

    Whereas, puzzle wants to name a star 'after me'. - 'DavidL', in the Andromedia Xerxes quadrant of Ursula Minor.
    But David, you must have heard, "He is named for his grandfather." for example, to mean "He is named after his grandfather." You, I think, are English and, like me, of a certain age, where the language meant something and was beautiful in it's subtlety.

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