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    #1

    interpretation of two expressions 2

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to review my interpretations of two expressions which attracted my attention by reading the following excerpt of Conan Doyle’s “The Gloria Scott”?

    “From that day, amid all his cordiality, there was always a touch of suspicion in Mr. Trevor’s manner towards me. Even his son remarked it. “You’ve given the governor such a turn; said he, ‘that he’ll never be sure again of what you know and what you don’t know.’ He did not mean to show it, I am sure, but it was so strongly in his mind that it peeped out at every action. At last I became do convinced that I was causing him uneasing that I drew my visit to a close. “

    .. Hudson it is, sir,’said the seaman. ‘Why, it’ thirty year and more since I saw you last. Here you are in your house, and me still picking my salt meat out of the harness cask.’

    1. to give somebody a turn (coll) = to cause a nervous shock, as in:

    The news gave her quite a turn. = The news gave her a bit of a jolt/shock.

    2. picking my salt meat out of the harness-cask – a figurative way of saying that he was still a sailor; harness-cask – the cask on the desk of a vessel for the daily supply of salt meat.

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards

    V.
    Last edited by vil; 27-Jul-2008 at 16:12.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #2

    Re: interpretation of two expressions 2

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to revise review my interpretations of two expressions which attracted my attention when reading the following excerpt of Conan Doyle’s “The Gloria Scott”?

    “From that day, amid all his cordiality, there was always a touch of suspicion in Mr. Trevor’s manner towards me. Even his son remarked it. “You’ve given the governor such a turn; said he, ‘that he’ll never be sure again of what you know and what you don’t know.’ He did not mean to show it, I am sure, but it was so strongly in his mind that it peeped out at every action. At last I became do convinced that I was causing him uneasing that I drew my visit to a close. “

    .. Hudson it is, sir,’said the seaman. ‘Why, it’ thirty year and more since I saw you last. Here you are in your house, and me still picking my salt meat out of the harness cask.’

    1. to give somebody a turn (coll) = to cause a nervous shock, as in:

    The news gave her quite a turn. = The news gave her a bit of a jolt/shock.

    2. picking my salt meat out of the harness-cask – a figurative way of saying that he was still a sailor; harness-cask – the cask on the desk of a vessel for the daily supply of salt meat.

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards

    V.
    .

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