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    • Join Date: Feb 2006
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    #1

    Causative Verbs

    Hello there!

    Help me out please..

    I have here two sentences using causative verbs (have/get) which are:

    a. You can have Mark's Repair Shop fix your bike.
    b. You can get a repair shop to fix your bike.

    And my questions are:

    1. Do we have to use "have" for a specific thing (Mark's Repair Shop) while using "get" for a general one (a repair shop)?

    2. Inthe first sentence, "fix" is used, while "to fix(an infinitive)" is used in the second sentence. Is this always the case? Can't we remove "to" in the second sentence?

    In anticipation for your response, thank you very much.


    • Join Date: May 2008
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    #2

    Re: Causative Verbs

    I think they are interchangable.

    a. You can have Mark's Repair Shop fix your bike.
    a1. You can get Mark's repair shop to fix your bike.
    b. You can get a repair shop to fix your bike.
    b2. You can have a repair shop fix your bike.

    However it would be incorrect to remove the "to" from the second sentence. The full infinitive is required in such a construction.

    I'm not a teacher.

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    #3

    Re: Causative Verbs

    I'm not a teacher.

    Hi blue_jay975,


    There are a few words concerning the matter in question.


    Causative Verbs


    Jack had his house painted.
    This sentence is similar in meaning to: Someone painted Jack's house. OR Jack's house was painted by someone. Causative verbs express the idea of someone causing something to take place. Causative verbs can be similar in meaning to passive verbs.
    Examples:
    My hair was cut. (passive)
    I had my hair cut. (causative)
    Have' as a causative verb expresses the idea that the person wants something to be done for them. This causative verb is often used when speaking about various services. There are two forms of the causative verb 'have'.
    Subject + Have + Person + Base Form of Verb
    Examples:
    They had John arrive early.
    She had her children cook dinner for her.
    Construction Chart: Use 2 Subject + Have + Object + Past Participle
    Examples:
    I had my hair cut last Saturday.
    She had the car washed at the weekend.
    Have

    FORM

    [have + person + verb]
    USE

    This construction means "to give someone the responsibility to do something."
    Examples:

    • Dr. Smith had his nurse take the patient's temperature.
    • Please have your secretary fax me the information.
    • I had the mechanic check the brakes.

    Get

    FORM

    [get + person + to + verb]
    USE

    This construction usually means "to convince to do something" or "to trick someone into doing something."
    Examples:

    • Susie got her son to take the medicine even though it tasted terrible.
    • How can parents get their children to read more?
    • The government TV commercials are trying to get people to stop smoking.

    Get vs. Have

    Sometimes "get someone to do something" is interchangeable with "have someone do something," but these expressions do not mean exactly the same thing.
    Examples:

    • I got the mechanic to check my brakes.
      At first the mechanic didn't think it was necessary, but I convinced him to check the brakes.
    • I had the mechanic check my brakes.
      I asked the mechanic to check the brakes.

    Regards

    V.


    • Join Date: Feb 2006
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    #4

    Re: Causative Verbs

    A million thanks!

    Till next time.

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    #5

    Re: Causative Verbs

    I'm not a teacher.

    Hi blue_jay975,

    We use the causative when we do not carry out an action ourselves, but are responsible for the action being performed.

    E.g: She had her car serviced last week - (She didn't service the car herself, but the car was serviced because of her; she took it to a garage and asked them to do it.)

    Regards

    V.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Causative Verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    I'm not a teacher.

    Hi blue_jay975,


    There are a few words concerning the matter in question.


    Causative Verbs

    Hi vii,
    Can you tell me what page you got this info from?

  2. ladybird987's Avatar

    • Join Date: Jul 2008
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    #7

    Re: Causative Verbs

    Why, are you suggesting, he signed his name under someone else's job?

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    #8

    Re: Causative Verbs

    Hi Raymott,

    I have not doubts as to your sincerity putting the following uestion: Can you tell me what page you got this info from?

    Certainly, it goes without saying.

    There are two links:

    English Grammar - Causative Verbs
    ENGLISH PAGE - Let / Make / Have / Get

    You can find many others in Ask.com.

    Ask.com UK Web Search

    Regards

    V.

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    #9

    Re: Causative Verbs

    Hi ladybird987,

    Three cheers for Polish gentry.!!! What a resourcefulness of you?

    Regards

    V.

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    #10

    Re: Causative Verbs

    I'm not a teacher.

    Hi blue_jay975,

    Using again a reliable, well informed source, I feel obliged to try and find some way to answer to your second question.

    2. In the first sentence, "fix" is used, while "to fix(an infinitive)" is used in the second sentence. Is this always the case? Can't we remove "to" in the second sentence?

    The most common error with causatives is using "to" unnecessarily. For example,

    We made Kevin to finish his supper.
    We made Kevin finish his supper.
    They suggested Irene to take music lessons.
    They suggested that Irene take music lessons.
    (Incorrect)
    (Correct)
    (Incorrect)
    (Correct)

    Causative Verbs

    Regards

    V.
    Last edited by vil; 30-Jul-2008 at 07:52.

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