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      • Native Language:
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      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
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    • Join Date: Sep 2007
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    #1

    all the better for/none the better for/much the worse for/none the worse for

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to explain to me the general meaning of the word combination “all the better for” in the following excerpt of the W.Somerset Maugham’s “Mr. Know-all”.

    “When I went on board I found Mr. Kelada's luggage already below. I did not like the look of it; there were too many labels on the suitcases, and the wardrobe trunk was too big. He had unpacked his toilet things, and I observed that he was a patron of the excellent Monsieur Coty; for I saw on the washing-stand his scent, his hairwash and his brilliantine.
    Mr. Kelada's brushes, ebony with his monogram in gold, would have been all the better for a scrub. I did not at all like Mr. Kelada. I made my way into the smoking-room. I called for a pack of cards and began to play patience”.
    I know the meaning of the idiom “all better” namely “completely healed or cured” so in the present context “Mr. Kelada’s brushes weren’t distinguished for their cleanness.

    May you paraphrase the following sentences?
    The floor will be all the better for a scrub.
    He seems none the better for the treatment.
    His coat is much the worse for wear.
    You will be none the worse for a good sleep.
    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards

    V.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #2

    Re: all the better for/none the better for/much the worse for/none the worse for

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to explain to me the general meaning of the word combination “all the better for” in the following excerpt of the W.Somerset Maugham’s “Mr. Know-all”.

    “When I went on board I found Mr. Kelada's luggage already below. I did not like the look of it; there were too many labels on the suitcases, and the wardrobe trunk was too big. He had unpacked his toilet things, and I observed that he was a patron of the excellent Monsieur Coty; for I saw on the washing-stand his scent, his hairwash and his brilliantine.
    Mr. Kelada's brushes, ebony with his monogram in gold, would have been all the better for a scrub. I did not at all like Mr. Kelada. I made my way into the smoking-room. I called for a pack of cards and began to play patience”.
    I know the meaning of the idiom “all better” namely “completely healed or cured” so in the present context “Mr. Kelada’s brushes weren’t distinguished for their cleanness. "all the better for something" = will be much improved by doing something" [in this case, being washed!]

    May you paraphrase the following sentences?
    The floor will be all the better for a scrub.
    He seems none the better for the treatment. No = none the worse for the treatment OR doesn't seem any better for the treatment.
    His coat is much the worse for wear.
    You will be none the worse for a good sleep.
    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards

    V.
    .

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,000
    #3

    Re: all the better for/none the better for/much the worse for/none the worse for

    Hi Anglika.

    Thank you for your prompt reply.

    Thank you also for your helpful explanations.

    Regards

    V.

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