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    #1

    interpretation of three idioms 2

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to review my interpretations of three idioms which focused my attention when reading a random dialog?

    “To tell you the truth, I’ve been thinking about that. In fact, I shall make a point of doing that first thing next week. Yesterday we had an awful row. Victor was all for going to Peter’s again and I tried to talk him out of it, but I might have spared my breath – he wouldn’t listen. I was beside myself with anger, and I told him then and there that if he went, I’d wash my hands of him.”

    “I know. But it’s easier said than done. When I told Mother not to worry about us, I had had no idea that it would be so difficult. It’s anything but easy to look after one’s younger brother. And Victor seemed such an easy-going sort.”

    1. to make a point of = to insist on; consider as necessary or very important; treat something as important or essential

    2. to wash one’s hands of = to decline responsibility, to rid oneself of the responsibility for…, refuse to accept responsibility for; abandon or renounce

    3. a good sort (an easy-going sort) = a likeable, friendly person

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards

    V.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: interpretation of three idioms 2

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to review my interpretations of three idioms which focused my attention when reading a random dialog?

    “To tell you the truth, I’ve been thinking about that. In fact, I shall make a point of doing that first thing next week. Yesterday we had an awful row. Victor was all for going to Peter’s again and I tried to talk him out of it, but I might have spared my breath – he wouldn’t listen. I was beside myself with anger, and I told him then and there that if he went, I’d wash my hands of him.”

    “I know. But it’s easier said than done. When I told Mother not to worry about us, I had had no idea that it would be so difficult. It’s anything but easy to look after one’s younger brother. And Victor seemed such an easy-going sort.”

    1. to make a point of = to insist on; consider as necessary or very important; treat something as important or essential

    2. to wash one’s hands of = to decline responsibility, to rid oneself of the responsibility for…, refuse to accept responsibility for; abandon or renounce

    3. a good sort (an easy-going sort) = a likeable, friendly person

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards

    V.
    1. to make a point of = to insist on; consider as necessary or very important; treat something as important or essential.
    Yes, to "make a point of doing something", a person might write it down so they don't forget. Same as "I'll make a note to do that".

    2. to wash one’s hands of = to decline responsibility, to rid oneself of the responsibility for…, refuse to accept responsibility for; abandon or renounce.
    Yes, I think this derives from the Biblical passage where Pontius Pilate literally washes his hands of the blood of Jesus, and refuses to accept responsibility for what happened next. (If that wasn't the derivation, it certainly means the same thing).


    3. a good sort (an easy-going sort) = a likeable, friendly person
    An easy-going sort means what you say - someone who takes things casually and doesn't let things get to him (annoy him).
    A "good sort" is an idiom for a desirable and sexy woman (or man). So don't call your friend a "good sort" if you mean "easy-going"!


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    #3

    Re: interpretation of three idioms 2

    Hi Raymott,

    Thank you for your prompt reply.

    Thank you also for your helpful explanations as well as for your relevant modifications.

    Thank you for your warning concerning the usage of the expression “good sort”. By good luck as a knowledgeable person I don’t rub elbows with people which are known as “a goody –goody” or “harmless individuals”. I don’t like people which “look as if butter wouldn’t melt in their mouth” or such people which “can’t say boo to a goose”.

    Thank you again.

    Regards

    V.
    Last edited by vil; 30-Jul-2008 at 16:02.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: interpretation of three idioms 2

    A "good sort" is an idiom for a desirable and sexy woman (or man). So don't call your friend a "good sort" if you mean "easy-going"!

    Is that an Australianism Raymott? I haven't come across that use of it before.
    Last edited by bhaisahab; 30-Jul-2008 at 15:15. Reason: typo

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: interpretation of three idioms 2

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    A "good sort" is an idiom for a desirable and sexy woman (or man). So don't call your friend a "good sort" if you mean "easy-going"!

    Is that an Australianism Raymott? I haven't come across that use of it before.
    I suppose it must be. Thanks for pointing that out.
    A Google search revealed that all the examples with that meaning are from .au web-sites. eg:

    "Well, at least she is a good sort, must be hard to resist such a beautiful woman, assuming she seduced him. There is nothing to say Bono didn't pursue her. Goodluck to them, i hope they are both happy, whatever happens"

    "Fergie is not the best of all female artists but i will admit she is a good sort."

    "Denise - I have caught up with Denise the most times - total of four times so far. She is a very nice person and in many ways a good fit for me. The X factor is missing though. On the positive side - she is a good sort."

    So, you're safe to use it elsewhere, vil!

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