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    #1

    like vs as

    Teachers in this country have generally been trained either to
    approach mathematics like a creative activity or that they should
    force students to memorize rules and principles without truly
    understanding how to apply them.

    A
    to approach mathematics like a creative activity or to force
    students to memorize rules and principles

    B
    to approach mathematics as a creative activity or to force
    students to memorize rules and principles

    The above sentence is incorrect.. however, One between A and B fits the bill. It was given that B is the correct choice. I chose A.

    Could someone please let me know the correct choice? and why? also please discuss the concepts of like vs as here:)

    thanks!

    PS: by the way, is 'fits the bill' a correct idiom?



    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #2

    Re: like vs as

    Quote Originally Posted by kiranlegend View Post
    Teachers in this country have generally been trained either to
    approach mathematics like a creative activity or that they should
    force students to memorize rules and principles without truly
    understanding how to apply them.

    A
    to approach mathematics like a creative activity or to force
    students to memorize rules and principles

    B
    to approach mathematics as a creative activity or to force
    students to memorize rules and principles

    The above sentence is incorrect.. however, One between A and B fits the bill. It was given that B is the correct choice. I chose A.


    Could someone please let me know the correct choice? and why? also please discuss the concepts of like vs as here:)


    thanks!


    PS: by the way, is 'fits the bill' a correct idiom?


    B is the correct choice. "As" in this context is used to describe the purpose or quality of someone or something - in this case the purpose is mathematics as a creative activity.

    I'm not sure what you mean by "One between A and B fits the bill" [use of the idiom is fine].

  1. IvanV's Avatar

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
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    #3

    Re: like vs as

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    I'm not sure what you mean by "One between A and B fits the bill" [use of the idiom is fine].
    I get that as:
    Only one of them is the right choice.

    I.

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    #4

    Re: like vs as

    oh. I got it. Thanks! but, If one uses like instead of as, what does the sentence infers then?

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    #5

    Re: like vs as

    I’m not a teacher.

    Hi kirandlegend,

    We use “like” when we compare things.

    “Everyt\one is sick at home. Our house is like as hospital.”

    We use “as” + noun to say what something really is or was (especially when we talk about someone’s job or how we use something).
    Please, see again the perfect Anglika's explanation above.

    Regards

    V.

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    #6

    Re: like vs as

    yeah got it!:) thanks:)


    • Join Date: Aug 2008
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    #7

    Re: like vs as

    Just as a further illustration in case anyone is interested, I constantly have students who say things like:
    "I work like an engineer."
    As Vil said, like is used to compare two different things, which would mean that I am not actually an engineer, but that my work habits are somehow similar to an engineer's.
    Therefore, it would be appropriate to say:
    "I work like a slave."
    This would mean your work habits are similar to a slave's.
    When you want to label yourself with a job title (engineer, for instance), "as" is the appropriate word since you are saying that you are actually an engineer.
    I know this question was answered but I figured this might be useful to some people. Although the previous answers were great, I figured I'd elaborate a little in case it was helpful to anyone.

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