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    #1

    guilty mycethmi black as night

    Hello, teachers.
    I have a question about the phrase "guilty mycethmi black as night" in the following sentence.

    "(In the human mind) There are sunny mountain-tops, there are innocent green arbours, or closes of too highly-perfumed flowers, or dank dungeons of despair, or guilty mycethmi black as night, where we walk alone, whither we may lead no one with us by the hand."
    (The Nebuly Coat by J.M.Falkner)

    I found out that "mycethmi" is a latinized Greek word meaning "bellowing", and my question is: am I right to interpret "guilty mycethmi black as night" as "a cave, dark as night, where the voice of guilty conscience reverberates"? "Bellowing" means a loud utterance, but since the sentence enumerates various "places", I think it should mean a place like a cave where sounds echo. I appreciate any comments from you. Thank you!!

  1. RonBee's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: guilty mycethmi black as night

    You may see a cave in that phrase if you wish, but that is an interpretation. (Certainly, it tends to be dark inside caves.)

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: guilty mycethmi black as night

    Quote Originally Posted by imchongjun View Post
    Hello, teachers.
    I have a question about the phrase "guilty mycethmi black as night" in the following sentence.

    "(In the human mind) There are sunny mountain-tops, there are innocent green arbours, or closes of too highly-perfumed flowers, or dank dungeons of despair, or guilty mycethmi black as night, where we walk alone, whither we may lead no one with us by the hand."
    (The Nebuly Coat by J.M.Falkner)

    I found out that "mycethmi" is a latinized Greek word meaning "bellowing", and my question is: am I right to interpret "guilty mycethmi black as night" as "a cave, dark as night, where the voice of guilty conscience reverberates"? "Bellowing" means a loud utterance, but since the sentence enumerates various "places", I think it should mean a place like a cave where sounds echo. I appreciate any comments from you. Thank you!!
    I think it is referring to the human mind.

    • Member Info
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    #4

    Re: guilty mycethmi black as night

    Thank you, RonBee and bhaisahab, for your comments. I guess I need to think about the phrase a little more.

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