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    • Join Date: Apr 2008
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    #1

    Aesop

    I would appreciate it if somebody could find time to proofread my interpretation of a parable about Aesop. Thanks.

    A Foolish Wife

    Xanthus’s wife wanted to have a personal man-slave. Xanthus loved his wife very much and couldn’t refuse her that. But being a greedy man, he bought the cheapest slave whose name was Aesop and who looked so ugly that nobody would even want to take him free. Xanthus’s wife got furious at seeing Aesop. “How could you have brought this fright home?” she said to her husband. “My friends will laugh at me, should they see me with him. I’m leaving you, Xanfus, and I want my dowry back.” Knowing about Aesop’s eloquent talant, Xanthus asked him to persuade his wife to stay. Aesop said, “Woman, don’t you realize that if Xanthus had bought you a handsome man-slave, your friends would be gossiping that you were having an affair with him. You wouldn’t want it, would you? Now when you have me, you can rest assured nobody will say anything like that.” And the woman agreed to have Aesop in her home and stayed with her husband.
    Last edited by Clark; 01-Aug-2008 at 14:48.

  1. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    • Join Date: Apr 2008
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    #2

    Re: Aesop

    Xanthus’s wife wanted to have a personal male slave. Xanthus loved his wife very much and couldn’t refuse her request. But as a miser, he bought a cheapest slave named Aesop, who was so ugly that almost no one would like to take him even for free. Xanthus’s wife got furious when she saw Aesop at first eyes.

    “How could you buy this monster home?” she said to her husband. “My friends will laugh at me, should they see me with him. I’m leaving you, Xanfus, and I want my dowry back.”

    Knowing about Aesop’s eloquence, Xanthus asked Aesop to persuade his wife to stay.

    Aesop said, “Madam, don’t you realize that if Xanthus bought a handsome male slave for you, your friends would gossip that you had an affair with him. You don't like that, do you? Now you have me, you can rest assured nobody will say anything like that.”

    So the woman stayed with her husband.
    Not a teacher. I enjoy the story.


    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 810
    #3

    Re: Aesop

    Quote Originally Posted by Clark View Post
    I would appreciate it if somebody could find time to proofread my interpretation of a parable about Aesop. Thanks.

    A Foolish Wife

    Xanthus’s wife wanted to have a personal man-slave. Xanthus loved his wife very much and couldn’t refuse her that. But being a greedy man, he bought the cheapest slave whose name was Aesop and who looked so ugly that nobody would even want to take him for free. Xanthus’s wife got furious at seeing Aesop. “How could you have brought this fright home?” she said to her husband. “My friends will laugh at me, should they see me with him. I’m leaving you, Xanfus, and I want my dowry back.” Knowing about Aesop’s eloquent talent, Xanthus asked him to persuade his wife to stay. Aesop said, “Woman, don’t you realize that if Xanthus had bought you a handsome man-slave, your friends would be gossiping that you were having an affair with him. You wouldn’t want that, would you? By having me, you can rest assured nobody will say anything like that.” And the woman agreed to have Aesop in her home and stayed with her husband.
    I'm not a teacher.


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #4

    Re: Aesop

    Xanthus’s wife wanted to have a personal

    man-slave: if the implication is that this slave was also to be used, how shall I say, to occasionally, often, full-time, substitute for Xanthus's conjugal duties. If he was to be merely a slave around the place, who happens to be male, then 'male slave'.

    Xanthus loved his wife very much and couldn’t refuse her. (that-omit). But being a frugal man, he bought the cheapest slave, whose name was Aesop and who looked so ugly that nobody would even want to

    take him free. You are talking about a slave, about a person who is not 'free'; and at the same time, actually meaning in this phrase, 'for nothing, for no money at all'. Be kind to your reader, and the flow of your story, by not having the reader need to go back and decide which you are referring to - 'set him free' or

    even want him for nothing.

    Xanthus’s wife got furious on seeing Aesop. (Editorializing as usual: my suspicious are confirmed - she has plans for this slave!)

    “How could you have brought this fright home?” she said to her husband. “My friends will laugh at me, should they see me with him. I’m leaving you, Xanthus, and I want my dowry back.” Knowing about Aesop’s talent for eloquence, Xanthus asked him to persuade his wife to stay. Aesop said, “Woman, don’t you realize that if Xanthus had bought you a handsome man-slave, your friends would be gossiping that you were having an affair with him?"

    (I didn't need to read ahead. I was ahead of her! And Aesop has latched on to her real motive.)

    You wouldn’t want it, would you? Now when you have me, you can rest assured nobody will say anything like that.” And the woman agreed to have Aesop in her home and stayed with her husband.

    (She was found out. What else could she say or do? She'll still be 'restless'.)

    (OK. OK. So perhaps I have more fun gleaning the message of any fable and the subtext of an anecdote than most people!)
    Last edited by David L.; 01-Aug-2008 at 16:13.


    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 1,571
    #5

    Re: Aesop

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    Xanthus’s wife wanted to have a personal man-slave: if the implication is that this slave was also to be used, how shall I say, to occasionally, often, full-time, substitute for Xanthus's conjugal duties. If he was to be merely a slave around the place, who happens to be male, then 'male slave'. Xanthus loved his wife very much and couldn’t refuse her. (that-omit).



    Thanks for this exquisite euphemism!

    I think 'male slave' would be the right word here. Otherwise the next sentence 'Xanthus' loved his wife and couldn't refuse her' turns the whole story into a different genre of literature.


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #6

    Re: Aesop

    And I see where you're at and coming from!

    Your command of English is also 'exquisite'. You just need the fine tuning that comes from those 'living the language'.
    Last edited by David L.; 01-Aug-2008 at 17:09.

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