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    #1

    a heartfelt thanks or heartfelt thanks

    For example i am using 'Yahoo' i join a chat room.A user welcomes me.How can i thank him if i use the word 'heartfelt' too.Like there is a user ID is good-boy, welcomes me right?Is it correct to "a heartfelt thanks,good-boy or i must say,heartfelt thanks.Good boy regards!

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    #2

    Re: a heartfelt thanks or heartfelt thanks

    Either or.


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    #3

    Re: a heartfelt thanks or heartfelt thanks

    According to Oxford Advance Dictionary 'thanks' is a plural noun and can only be used in that form. We know that a plural noun does not take an article, also heartfelt which is an adjective is not the owner of the article 'a'. Therefore, I deduce that 'heartfelt thanks' rather than 'a heartfelt thanks' is a better expression.

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    #4

    Re: a heartfelt thanks or heartfelt thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by beauty3 View Post
    According to Oxford Advance Dictionary 'thanks' is a plural noun and can only be used in that form. We know that a plural noun does not take an article, also heartfelt which is an adjective is not the owner of the article 'a'. Therefore, I deduce that 'heartfelt thanks' rather than 'a heartfelt thanks' is a better expression.
    It's interpreted as a heartfelt "thanks"; i.e., a heartfelt [word].


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    #5

    Re: a heartfelt thanks or heartfelt thanks

    'heartfelt' is the kind of word you would use to thank people who have sent Sympathy cards to you when someone close has died.
    "Our family wishes to convey our heartfelt gratitude for your words of comfort at our time of loss."
    It can also be used in 'lighter' contexts, 'lighter' social situations, where the person is being 'sincere' but lighthearted, and maintaining a semi-formal correctness in the situation.
    A speech by the president or head organizer to all the people attending a fête:
    "The Women's Committee wishes to express its heartfelt thanks to all who contributed to the Jumble Sale, and helped to make today such a success. As you know, we desperately need the money we have raised today." (Laughter)

    It is a little OTT for someone who is just saying "hi" to a new member in a chat room. "Many thanks, good boy" would be enough.

    As to the use of 'heartfelt':
    My heartfelt thanks for...
    A heartfelt "thank you" to all those who...
    Last edited by David L.; 02-Aug-2008 at 17:09.

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    #6

    Re: a heartfelt thanks or heartfelt thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    It's interpreted as a heartfelt "thanks"; i.e., a heartfelt [word].
    Thanks=thank-you
    A heartfelt thanks=a heartfelt thank-you
    (Not a teacher)

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    #7

    Re: a heartfelt thanks or heartfelt thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by albertino View Post
    Thanks=thank-you
    A heartfelt thanks=a heartfelt thank-you
    (Not a teacher)
    Thank you can take a hyphen (See the comment dated Tuesday, July 31 2001) but not in that context.

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    #8

    Re: a heartfelt thanks or heartfelt thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    Thank you can take a hyphen (See the comment dated Tuesday, July 31 2001) but not in that context.
    "If you're using this little phrase as a noun or an adjective, use the hyphen:
    • The bride sent her thank-you notes by Airborne Express.
    • The actor's idea of an appropriate thank-you was to throw a big party." (heartfelt thank-you)
    What is the difference, Soup?

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    #9

    Re: a heartfelt thanks or heartfelt thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by albertino View Post
    "If you're using this little phrase as a noun or an adjective, use the hyphen:
    • The bride sent her thank-you notes by Airborne Express.
    • The actor's idea of an appropriate thank-you was to throw a big party." (heartfelt thank-you)
    What is the difference, Soup?
    Excuse me, but the part in brackets above; i.e., (heartfelt thank-you) wasn't in the source quoted. You seem to have added it. Please be more careful. Next time use square brackets [...].

    Adding a hyphen to heartfelt thank-you is done, although it is rarely found; however, the known or common saying is expressive A heartfelt "Thank you" (capitalization and quotation marks are optional). Some writers will even capitalize or italicize the entire word/phrase; e.g., a heartfelt THANK YOU; a heartfelt thank you., as "thank you" is meant to represent a written spoken-sentiment, not a noun. If it's viewed as a noun, then it can take a hyphen, but it's not viewed as a noun in our context.

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