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    #1

    She took an hour to get/getting ready.

    1. I took three hours getting home last night.
    2. She takes all day getting out of the bathroom.
    3. They took two hours unloading the ferry.
    Are the above sentences acceptable?


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    #2

    Re: She took an hour to get/getting ready.

    I think not. The participles should be changed to infinitives.


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    #3

    Re: She took an hour to get/getting ready.

    I was talking to my best student about your doubt and we concluded that your best choices are:

    She spent an hour to get ready.
    or
    It took her an hour to get ready.

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    #4

    Re: She took an hour to get/getting ready.

    Quote Originally Posted by mauricioaleite View Post
    I was talking to my best student about your doubt and we concluded that your best choices are:

    She spent an hour to get ready.
    or
    It took her an hour to get ready.
    She spent an hour getting ready.

    She took an hour to get ready.

    It took her an hour to get ready.
    Last edited by lucalita009; 02-Aug-2008 at 16:18. Reason: She took an hour to get ready.

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    #5

    Re: She took an hour to get/getting ready.


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    #6

    Re: She took an hour to get/getting ready.



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    #7

    Re: She took an hour to get/getting ready.

    "She took an hour to get ready". Full Stop. End of Sentence. OK.
    and
    "She took an hour getting ready, an hour saying her thank-yous and goodbyes, and an hour crying in the limousine about how beautiful the day had been so that she then took ages fixing her streaking mascara and eye-shadow. Poor old groom thought they'd miss the plane and this honeymoon wouldn't get off the ground."

    Can we use both the gerund form and the infinitive form?
    If so, what's the difference in meaning when I say:
    "I took three hours to get home last night."
    and
    "It took me three hours to get home last night."
    and
    "I took three hours getting home last night."
    Last edited by David L.; 02-Aug-2008 at 18:24.


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    #8

    Re: She took an hour to get/getting ready.

    The website sitifan refers us to gives us this:
    1. I took three hours getting home last night.
    2. She takes all day getting out of the bathroom.
    3. They took two hours unloading the ferry.
    4. She took an hour getting ready.
    Which of the above sentences is NOT acceptable?
    Thank you very much for your reply.
    Teo
    Gold Member


    Re: She took an hour getting ready.
    by Alan on 13 Mar 2008, 06:19

    All possible, but #4 is rather unnatural: a native would prefer '...to get ready'.


    So - there's a danger sitifan is going to be left even more confused, because in my last post, I gave an example were 'getting ready' was acceptable.
    Instead, I would have chosen (2) as 'unacceptable' - (my reason given as appendix.), not (4). Before you look, anybody see the 'meaning' of this sentence the way I do, and agree?
    And would somebody like to have a go at explaining the different meanings of the different versions in my earlier post, to clarify things a little for sitifan?


    Appendix: If "She takes all day getting out of the bathroom", she's not ready for the big time yet! Houdini set the standard, so the folks expect at least a burglarproof safe, and a stunt that takes minutes. They ain't going to hang around looking at a bathroom door all day, waiting for her to escape from a bathroom!
    Last edited by David L.; 02-Aug-2008 at 19:25.

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    #9

    Re: She took an hour to get/getting ready.

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post

    Can we use both the gerund form and the infinitive form?
    If so, what's the difference in meaning when I say:
    "I took three hours to get home last night."
    and
    "It took me three hours to get home last night."
    You went to the mall, bought some stuff and came back by bus. The whole process took three hours.

    and
    "I took three hours getting home last night."
    You went to the same mall bought the same stuff, but comming back home you found yourself in a traffic jam, you spent 3 hours on the bus.

    I think you could use the first one here, but maybe the second is more emphatic about the time you spent in transit.


    I'm just guessing.


    Last edited by anreak; 02-Aug-2008 at 20:58.

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    #10

    Re: She took an hour to get/getting ready.

    http://www.english-test.net/forum/sutra97587.html#97587
    I really see no significant difference between those two sentences. However, there would be a difference if the sentence began with "it".

    Beginning the sentence with "I" (as you have done) suggests that "I" intentionally spent much more time than would otherwise be needed (or typical) to get from point X to home last night.

    .
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    Last edited by sitifan; 06-Aug-2008 at 13:07.

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