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    • Join Date: Mar 2007
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    #1

    Confusion

    Hello Teachers,

    I have read somewhere that "will have+PP" is used for talking about both past and future certainty. But how can we know the difference because the structure is same in both cases?

    Please help.

  1. IvanV's Avatar

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
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    #2

    Re: Confusion

    And what does PP stand for?

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    #3

    Re: Confusion

    probably past participle or perfect participle

    Regards

    V.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Confusion

    Quote Originally Posted by hsb View Post
    Hello Teachers,

    I have read somewhere that "will have+PP" is used for talking about both past and future certainty. But how can we know the difference because the structure is same in both cases?

    Please help.
    I don't think so. You can't use "will have + past participle" for the past.
    Can you give an example?

  3. IvanV's Avatar

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
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    #5

    Re: Confusion

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    probably past participle or perfect participle

    Regards

    V.
    Most probably, but which one remains the question.

    I.


    • Join Date: Mar 2007
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    #6

    Re: Confusion

    Hi Vil,

    Yes you are right.I meant "past participle"of main verb.


    • Join Date: Mar 2007
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    #7

    Re: Confusion

    Hello Raymott,

    Here is the link.

    English Grammar Lessons

    As given in this page "She'll have boarded her plane." How can I know if this structure has been used to predict what speaker think has already happened at present or to talk about what will have been achieved by a certain moment in time.

    Please explain.

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    #8

    Re: Confusion

    Hi hsb,

    I have the honor of being a humble student of Caroline and Pearson Brown. I know the quoted of you English Grammar Lesson.

    We can use 'will have done' to talk about what will have been achieved by a certain moment in time.

    Don't worry! I'll have finished this project by Friday. (today is Monday)

    We can also use 'will have done' to predict what we think has already happened at present.

    He'll have already read the report by now. Too late to change it.

    One thing remains certain. PP stands for "past participle" or "perfect participle" and all the rest are fluent phrases.

    The use of the Future Perfect in the Past

    The Future Perfect in the Past is used to denote an action completed before a definite moment which was future from the point of view of the past.

    I wondered whether they would have reached the place by noon.

    I knew they would have read the book by the 1 st of August.

    Regards

    V.

  4. IvanV's Avatar

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
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    #9

    Re: Confusion

    Quote Originally Posted by hsb View Post
    Hello Raymott,

    Here is the link.

    English Grammar Lessons

    As given in this page "She'll have boarded her plane." How can I know if this structure has been used to predict what speaker think has already happened at present (You can't use Future Perfect for past events!) or to talk about what will have been achieved by a certain moment in time.

    Please explain.
    This, on the other hand is probable:

    What is future-perfect-in-past tense?




    I.
    Last edited by IvanV; 04-Aug-2008 at 12:30.

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Confusion

    Quote Originally Posted by hsb View Post
    Hello Raymott,

    Here is the link.

    English Grammar Lessons

    As given in this page "She'll have boarded her plane." How can I know if this structure has been used to predict what speaker think has already happened at present or to talk about what will have been achieved by a certain moment in time.

    Please explain.
    OK
    She'll have boarded her plane. It's too late to contact her.
    You can tell from the context, which is usually given by an adverb. In this case the following sentence gives the context. If the first sentence meant "in the future", it would not be too late to contact her.
    In any case, it's a bad example. You'd normally hear "She'll have boarded her plane by now", which again means that it has already happened (or the speaker assumes it has).

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