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    #1

    prodigy / prodigal

    Dear teachers,

    I am astonished at the unconvincing similarity of the terms “prodigy” and “prodigal”. That glaring injustice disturbs my peace of mind.

    Would you be kind enough to give me a logical explanation about that regrettable misunderstanding?

    Regards

    V.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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      • Australia
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    • Join Date: Jun 2008
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    #2

    Re: prodigy / prodigal

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    I am astonished at the unconvincing similarity of the terms “prodigy” and “prodigal”. That glaring injustice disturbs my peace of mind.

    Would you be kind enough to give me a logical explanation about that regrettable misunderstanding?

    Regards

    V.
    They have different derivations.
    Prodigal from Latin prodigus (extravagant).
    Prodigy from Latin prodigium (pro(d) forward + agere act), for example, an omen , a portent -> a marvel; -> a person with marvellous abilities.
    (Oxford Dictionary)
    Also, prodigal has a hard g [g]; prodigy a soft g [dʒ]
    In short, they’re different words, and you just have to cop it

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