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  1. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #1

    Smile rat vs. mouse ( English connotation)

    Hello!

    I learned a rat means a bad person except for referring to the animal. Does mouse have any bad connotation? I didn't find this out in Cambridge Dictionaries Onlines. On the contrary, mouse seems to present a lovely image in English culture, for examples, Tom and Jerry, Michey mouse.

    People call someone bad name, saying he is a rat. No one says he is a mouse. Right?

    rat (PERSON)
    noun [C] INFORMAL
    an unpleasant person who deceives others or is not loyal
    Cambridge Dictionaries Online - Cambridge University Press

    Thank you!

  2. poorboy_9's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: rat vs. mouse ( English connotation)

    Some times there is a "lukewarm" comment that some appears "mousey".

  3. banderas's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: rat vs. mouse ( English connotation)

    It also describes hair which is brown and not special or attractive.


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    #4

    Re: rat vs. mouse ( English connotation)

    Of a woman: a shy, timid, and quiet person.

    Of man:
    "Are you a man or a mouse?" : brave versus timid (that is, a coward)

    Poor as a church mouse

    A Mickey Mouse operation

  4. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #5

    Smile Re: rat vs. mouse ( English connotation)

    Poorboy_9, Banderas & David L.:

    Thank you for your contributions.

    Though 'mouse' has sightly unpleasant connotations, being a mouse seems better than being a rat.

    Why do people hate rats more than mice? They're very similar in appearance.

    Do you or someone else have any idea?

  5. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: rat vs. mouse ( English connotation)

    It's that naked rat tail. (Blech)

  6. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #7

    Smile Re: rat vs. mouse ( English connotation)

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    It's that naked rat tail. (Blech)
    Thank you, Barb_D.

    Blech=?

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    #8

    Re: rat vs. mouse ( English connotation)

    A mouse is a small rat which is probably still innocent has not deve
    loped the obnoxious behaviour of a full-grown rat. That's why they call Mickey Mouse and not Mickey Rat.

    Also, the word brat - child who behaves badly eg. spoiled brat.

    bleh - like 'yuck', to show disgust.

    not a teacher

  7. Raymott's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: rat vs. mouse ( English connotation)

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    Why do people hate rats more than mice? They're very similar in appearance.
    Rats carry the bubonic plague. Mice don't. I think that's reason enough in historical terms for rats to have gained their nasty reputation.
    Also rats nibble on baby's toes; mice don't.
    On the other hand, rats provide good biological experimental material (perhaps that should have gone on the animal rights thread).

  8. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #10

    Smile Re: rat vs. mouse ( English connotation)

    Tedtmc & Raymott:

    Thank you for your intresting and informative replies.

    The year of 2008 is Chinese Year of Rodent. I see someone translated it into the Year of Rat. I think it might be better to name it Year of Mouse.

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