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  1. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #1

    Smile Re: UK Royal Coat of Arms

    Hello!

    Q1: What do the lion and horse stand for respectively?

    Q2: Why is a small lion rather than the horse put on the top middle of the royal arms?

    Q3: Is a must for British monarch to be able to speak French?


    Thanks in advance!

    PS: I have got the related info. about British motto in French in the arms.
    Dieu et mon droit - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 180px-UK_Royal_Coat_of_Arms_svg.jpg  


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    #2

    Re: UK Royal Coat of Arms

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    Hello!

    Q1: What do the lion and horse stand for respectively?

    Q2: Why is a small lion rather than the horse put on the top middle of the royal arms?

    Q3: Is a must for British monarch to be able to speak French?


    Thanks in advance!

    PS: I have got the related info. about British motto in French in the arms.
    Dieu et mon droit - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Heraldry is a highly specialised topic. However, the lion on the left is the symbol for England; the unicorn on the right [not a horse] is the symbol for Scotland. They are known as the supporters of the coat of arms.

    The coat of arms is quartered: the top left and bottom right quarters are the three lions [originally leopards] of England, the top right is the lion of Scotland; the bottom left is the harp of Ireland.

    The lion on the crown is again the symbol for the King/Queen.

    For precise information see here: Royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    #3 It is not a must. The motto is old French and goes back to the days when French was the court language.

  2. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #3

    Smile Re: UK Royal Coat of Arms

    Hello Anglika,

    Thank you very much for the cool answers. I'd like copy them down in my notebook.

    Cheers!

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: UK Royal Coat of Arms

    An addition to Anglika's answer; Old French is also the source of many heraldic terms. The lion is 'rampant'. On some coats of arms an animal is 'couchant' (lying down).

    b

    PS I have a theory about the source of 'Dieu et mon droit', but mabe I should have a special 'Bees In BobK's Bonnet' thread Bee in your bonnet - UsingEnglish.com
    Last edited by BobK; 06-Aug-2008 at 22:06. Reason: Fix typo

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: UK Royal Coat of Arms

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    An addition to Anglika's answer; Old French is also the source of many heraldic terms. The lion is 'rampant'. On some coats of arms an animal is 'couchant' (lying down).
    But why a lion? Were there lions in Britain? Why not, say, a badger and a hamster?

  5. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #6

    Smile Re: UK Royal Coat of Arms

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    An addition to Anglika's answer; Old French is also the source of many heraldic terms. The lion is 'rampant'. On some coats of arms an animal is 'couchant' (lying down).
    I learned the history of the world including the one of British in our textbook when I was a student. If my memory served me right, French was the language applied in high society after Norman Conquest, only the common, who were considered as less educated, spoke English at that time. So modern English language has absorbed many loan words from French language. I was not interested in that before, and just crammed for examinations. Now I regretted I didn't study hard. All subjects of courses are intertwined more or less.

    I think it is very necessary to study British history for whom want to genuinely understand English culture including English language.

    Why is the royal lion 'rampant'? Does it refer to the English people and English monarch are brave and ready for fighting for England any time? If you know, could you please give me an answer at your convenience?


    PS I have a theory about the source of 'Dieu et mon droit', but mabe I should have a special 'Bees In BobK's Bonnet' thread ;-D Bee in your bonnet - UsingEnglish.com
    Thanks for your offering the idiom link. It helps.

  6. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: UK Royal Coat of Arms

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    ...
    Why is the royal lion 'rampant'? Does it refer to the English people and English monarch are brave and ready for fighting for England any time? If you know, could you please give me an answer at your convenience?...
    I imagine that's the idea; it's just a public relations exercise, really. Not many people could read, so they used pictures; the lion is a symbol of strength and courage; and Europe at the time* was a violent and competitive place, so the lion was 'rampant'.


    b

    *The coat of arms you originally posted (see also http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lion_and_the_Unicorn ) dates from 1603. But a symbol using lions ('three lions passant gardant' whatever that means - they look as if they're walking past [passant] and waving [gardant] ) was in use as early as the 12th century - Coat of arms of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


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    #8

    Re: UK Royal Coat of Arms

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post

    Why is the royal lion 'rampant'? Does it refer to the English people and English monarch are brave and ready for fighting for England any time? If you know, could you please give me an answer at your convenience?

    .
    This is not really answerable simply. The use of animal symbols in heraldry is ancient and highly complex.

    The attitude of the creature used is more likely to be [a] the symbol used by a leader which is thereby differentiated from a similar one used by another leader, and [b] places the individual who has it within a lineal descent.

    This site is fairly comprehensive on the underlying meanings of heraldic symbols: The Meanings Behind the Symbols: Family Crests, Blazons, Coat of Arms, Personalized Crests

  7. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #9

    Smile Re: UK Royal Coat of Arms

    Raymott:

    Thank you for your attention. Sorry, I missed your post previously.

    BobK & Anglika:

    Thank you for your more info. about heraldry. They're interesting. I'd like to read them carefully.

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