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    • Join Date: Jan 2006
    • Posts: 54
    #1

    Question Are these correct?

    Hi

    We have just been looking at a story about pyramids and the following sentences were in it:

    However, scientists have proved that this is wrong. (british)

    ... but this has been proven to be wrong. (american)

    One co-worker has said that they are both correct (one is British and one is American) but that there should not be a mix of us in the one story.

    Does anyone have an opinion? Is one defn british use and one american?

    Any help is appreciated.
    thanks

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
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      • England
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    • Join Date: Apr 2008
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    #2

    Re: Are these correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by riceball72 View Post
    Hi

    We have just been looking at a story about pyramids and the following sentences were in it:

    However, scientists have proved that this is wrong. (british)

    ... but this has been proven to be wrong. (american)

    One co-worker has said that they are both correct (one is British and one is American) but that there should not be a mix of us in the one story.

    Does anyone have an opinion? Is one defn british use and one american?

    Any help is appreciated.
    thanks
    I believe that "proven" is mainly American usage, "proved" is mainly British.


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #3

    Re: Are these correct?

    For complex historical reasons, 'prove' developed two past participles: 'proved' and 'proven'. Both are correct and can be used more or less interchangeably. 'Proven' is the more common form when used as an adjective before the noun it modifies: 'a proven talent' (not : 'a proved talent'). Otherwise, the choice between them is not a matter of correctness, but usually of sound and rhythm—and often, consequently, a matter of familiarity, as in the legal idiom : 'innocent until proven guilty'.

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