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    • Join Date: Feb 2008
    • Posts: 269
    #1

    which one is right?

    Hi,

    I write down two sentence for this one - The first commandment is you got nothing coming. I was wondering if someone could take a look for me which one is right.

    The first commandment is you got nothing coming.
    1.The first commandment is you got nothing which comes (to you). 2.The first commandment is you got nothing which is coming (to you).

    Thanks for your help.


    B: Name and back number.
    M: Scofield, Michael. 94941.
    C: Are you a religious man, Scofield?
    M: Never really thought about it.
    B: Good, because ten commandments mean nothing here. We got two commandments and two only. The first commandment is you got nothing coming.
    M: What's the second commandment?
    B: See commandment number one.


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #2

    Re: which one is right?

    It means, 'don't expect to be given anything/ you are not entitled to receive anything'.
    Notice how, when M asks 'what is the second commandment?', B tells him to 'see'/refer to/think again about the meaning of commandment 1; that is, he gets NOTHING, not even a proper answer to a question!


    • Join Date: Feb 2008
    • Posts: 269
    #3

    Re: which one is right?

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    It means, 'don't expect to be given anything/ you are not entitled to receive anything'.
    Notice how, when M asks 'what is the second commandment?', B tells him to 'see'/refer to/think again about the meaning of commandment 1; that is, he gets NOTHING, not even a proper answer to a question!

    Hello, David L,

    G' day!

    Yes, I get it. And I was wondering if you could take a look for me at these two sentences I wrote down, which one is right? I mean, which one is interchangeable with "The first commandment is you got nothing coming" ?

    1.The first commandment is you got nothing which comes (to you).
    2.The first commandment is you got nothing which is coming (to you).



    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #4

    Re: which one is right?

    Let's first correct the grammar:
    1.The first commandment is, you get nothing that comes (to you).
    2.The first commandment is, you get nothing that is coming (to you).


    1. The sentence tells me, something has come to me -something has arrived and I've got it - yet what I've just got/received is 'nothing'.
    Did I ask for something (that the person then gave me) believing the 'something' is valuable. But, having given it to me, the person is then disparaging(=regards it as having little worth.) He tells me: -'what I have just given you is of no worth.' And moreover, this will always be the case - from now on, anything you happen to get is worthless.

    2. Someone sends me something/I deserve something...but it never arrives/I never get my just desserts(=what I am entitled to/what I think I should receive.) An example would be : It's like, someone sends a letter, but it never arrives. Or, someone promises you something, so you expect whatever it is they promised to do for you/the item they promised to send to you, but they don't fulfill their promise - it never comes/happens.
    Last edited by David L.; 11-Aug-2008 at 17:03.


    • Join Date: Feb 2008
    • Posts: 269
    #5

    Re: which one is right?

    [quote=David L.;334837]Let's first correct the grammar:
    1.The first commandment is, you get nothing that comes (to you).
    2.The first commandment is, you get nothing that is coming (to you).


    Hi, David L.

    Thanks.

    I have a grammar question about the sentence like this one- The first commandment is you got nothing coming.

    Or,
    How are those visits going with your parents?
    This is the girl talking with my mom.
    etc.

    First, is there grammatical term for these words (coming, going, talking) ?
    And second, how am I getting the sentence with this kind of word? Are they just used as adjectives to modify the nouns before them ?



    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #6

    Re: which one is right?

    Firstly, remember how we form the continous tenses:

    He goes,
    He is going - present continuous
    He talks, he talked
    He is talking, he was talking - present continuous, past continuous

    So - let's change your sentence How are those visits going with your parents?
    so that it is not a question, so it is easier for you to see:
    Those visits (with my parents) are going fine.
    You have formed the present continuous tense.
    So - "How are those visits with your parents going?"

    This is the girl talking with my mom.
    What is being said is:
    This is the girl. The girl is talking with my mom.
    It is the present continuous tense. But we don't break the sentence up like that, we don't say it like that - we make the second sentence into a 'participle clause' :
    This is the girl, talking with my mom.


    • Join Date: Feb 2008
    • Posts: 269
    #7

    Re: which one is right?

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    Firstly, remember how we form the continous tenses:

    This is the girl talking with my mom.
    What is being said is:
    This is the girl. The girl is talking with my mom.
    It is the present continuous tense. But we don't break the sentence up like that, we don't say it like that - we make the second sentence into a 'participle clause' :
    This is the girl, talking with my mom.
    Hi, David L.

    Thank you.

    This is the girl talking with my mom.
    What is being said is:
    This is the girl. The girl is talking with my mom.

    I have a question, if I wanna say -
    This is the girl. The girl talks with my mom. /
    This is the girl. The girl talked with my mom. /
    This is the girl. The girl was talking with my mom.

    Then may I use "This is the girl talking with my mom" instead of them? I mean, how do you know the second sentence (The girl is talking with my mom) would be the present continuous tense, not the other tenses ?



    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #8

    Re: which one is right?

    Please, Xinlai-ue : just as I would point out that somebody is using slang in a formal letter, I'd like to mention that 'wanna' is fine for chat-rooms, but is out of place when we are helping you to learn and practice 'correct' English. It is important to understand what style of language to use in which particular situation. It's better to start with 'correct' English: note that when we respond, we don't say, 'wanna' and 'gonna';
    ...but that you find that such words are OK to use when you're in chat-rooms and speaking very, very casually.

    This is the girl. The girl talks with my mom.* / The girl is talking with my mom.** - present tense*, then present continuous.**
    This is the girl. The girl talked with my mom*. / The girl was talking with my mom.** - past tense*, then past continuous.**

    We are using the infinitive 'to be' in the present tense 'is', and then past tense 'was' - 'is talking' 'was talking' - and this tells us whether it is the present continuous, or the past continuous.
    When we use Present Perfect tense, we say, "The girl has talked". We make this into Present Perfect Continuous tense:
    She has + been + talking.
    Past Continuous tense would be:
    She had + been + talking.
    Last edited by David L.; 13-Aug-2008 at 14:28.

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