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    • Join Date: Mar 2005
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    #1

    On The Job

    Dear friends and Teachers,

    A. Are you still in the job or have you and your boss both been sacked by her boss for being a slacker on the job?

    - Does "still in the job" mean "still being employed"? And I understand the meaning of "slacker", but what does "on the job" mean here?

    Thanks a million!

    NamSteven

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    #2

    Re: On The Job

    Does "still in the job" mean "still being employed"?

    Yes, that's the way it's being used here. A tip to seeing this is the question "or have you and your boss both been sacked", which probably means the opposite of "still on the job", which would be to not have been sacked.

    By the way, we usually use 'on' here - 'still on the job'.

  1. buggles's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: On The Job

    Quote Originally Posted by namsteven View Post
    Dear friends and Teachers,

    A. Are you still in the job or have you and your boss both been sacked by her boss for being a slacker on the job?

    - Does "still in the job" mean "still being employed"? And I understand the meaning of "slacker", but what does "on the job" mean here?

    Thanks a million!

    NamSteven
    "In a job" certainly means "in employment", but "on the job" usually means actually working. You can be in a job, but not on the job if you are failing to work while you're there.

    Buggles (not a teacher)

  2. buggles's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: On The Job

    Quote Originally Posted by buggles View Post
    "In a job" certainly means "in employment", but "on the job" usually means actually working. You can be in a job, but not on the job if you are failing to work while you're there.

    Buggles (not a teacher)
    Just a thought to add to this - be careful where and when you use "on the job".
    "On the job" is an idiom for indulging in sexual intercourse!
    Could cause a bit of embarrassment if you referred to the boss and his secretary being "on the job" - far safer to say they are working together.

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    #5

    Re: On The Job

    Hi buggles,

    Passing over in silence your sexual aberration I indulge in the luxury of defining more accurately the proper meaning of the expression in question:

    on the job (idiom)

    1. At work, busy, as in :
    We've got three men on the job. [Late 1800s]

    2. Paying close attention, alert, as in:
    Trust Jim to find out the details--he's always on the job.

    on-the-job: Definition and Much More from Answers.com

    Regards

    V.

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