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    • Join Date: Aug 2008
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    #1

    difcicult to follow dialogues

    Hi,
    Let me introduce myself as an english medium educated graduate from Mumbai, India. My prob is while listening to the hollywood movies dialogues, i guess i don't follow each and every word spoken by the characters. Roughly in all i am able to gather 60 percent of the spoken conversation in the movie. I have to depend heavily on the sub-titles when i rent a dvd. I had always faced this problem right from my school days. But i must point out that comparitvely i follow much more now.
    The english serials are much more easy to follow, though not 100 per cent. Is there any way by which i can improve my listening skills.
    P.S. No, nothing wrong with my ears.


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
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    #2

    Re: difcicult to follow dialogues

    Be reassured, that as a UK native speaker, I have to listen extra carefully - and even rewind the DVD - to understand some of the dialogue at times in Hollywood movies. They are too busy being 'tough, rough, and this is me, how raw and natural I am' that the words are mumbled or swallowed.
    Then again, I was in Thailand with free in-house Hollywood movies in one of the hotels. Despite the impeccable quality of the picture and sound, the subtitles (I had no choice), made me suspect they were pirated. If some of your DVDs are the same:
    The most recent of the Harry Potter movies they showed (just opened in the cinemas) was more entertaining comparing the spoken English dialogue with the English subtitles. One I remember: something about 'a torch seen in the wood', out of the blue, whatever the conversation had been, became something about 'a touch-screen TV"...
    Last edited by David L.; 11-Aug-2008 at 18:57.

  1. philadelphia's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: difcicult to follow dialogues

    All right! I understand better why I am having trouble sometimes. By the by, would you have some nice UK's films to advise?
    Last edited by philadelphia; 11-Aug-2008 at 20:23. Reason: Typo


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
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    #4

    Re: difcicult to follow dialogues

    Tell me some of the films you have seen that you liked, and I'll try to match your taste with some suggestions. I'm a film fan, from the Thirties on.

    'from the Thirties on': a fan of films, from those made in the 1930's, to now ( far less now, though!). "They don't make 'em like they used to."

  2. philadelphia's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: difcicult to follow dialogues

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    Tell me some of the films you have seen that you liked, and I'll try to match your taste with some suggestions. I'm a film fan, from the Thirties on.

    'from the Thirties on': a fan of films, from those made in the 1930's, to now ( far less now, though!). "They don't make 'em like they used to."
    You must surely be fond of Clint Eastwood - at a guess though. He is to me the first great actor from 1950. My favorite with him will remain Heartbreak Ridge in 1986

    So, to keep talking on UK's films, I do like James Bond 007 and I am ashame to say that I cannot help me remembering the others. Indeed, I am rather used to watching American movies.

    However, I daresay I like films which use mysteries, intrigues and these with a kind of actions. To sum it up, films which nicely puzzle me. Thanks in advance


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
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    #6

    Re: difcicult to follow dialogues

    So - we are looking for videos with a minimum of 'dialect' speech; that use 'correct' English rather than predominantly 'uneducated'; and that do not talk at some adrenalin-pumping rate that you're hard-pressed to catch the words.
    And 'films that nicely puzzle me'. (Brush up on the difference between using 'which' and 'that').
    Trouble is, when there's action included, the dialogue speeds up to match (and accelerate) the heart rate of the audience, which puts you back in the situation of the Action Movies you've been watching.
    My suggestions:
    The British TV series of:
    Jonathan Creek - fantastic
    Poirot - the series with David Suchet (because your first language is French, and he comes out with some French phrases at times that you will appreciate, rather than mystify you - being in a supposedly English language film - as they might some of the forum members.)
    Miss Marple - with Joan Hicks. Not the travesty called "Marple".

    If you really like mysteries, that is!
    (Trouble is, in France, your using the Secam G system. I can't see why, in converting these videos for such a small non-English speaking, Secam-using market, the commercial DVDs would bother to include English subtitles. Do your DVD players have the capacity to play PAL videos - just like, over here, our DVD players will automatically play both PAL and NTSC discs?)

    Of the Jonathan Creeks: despite my youthful diet of Agatha Christie, I only solved one before Jonathan.

    It behooves me, when I have some more time, to correct the erring grammar in your post.
    Last edited by David L.; 13-Aug-2008 at 18:10.

  3. philadelphia's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: difcicult to follow dialogues

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    So - we are looking for videos with a minimum of 'dialect' speech; that use 'correct' English rather than predominantly 'uneducated'; and that do not talk at some adrenalin-pumping rate that you're hard-pressed to catch the words.
    And 'films that nicely puzzle me'. (Brush up on the difference between using 'which' and 'that').
    Trouble is, when there's action included, the dialogue speeds up to match (and accelerate) the heart rate of the audience, which puts you back in the situation of the Action Movies you've been watching.
    My suggestions:
    The British TV series of:
    Jonathan Creek - fantastic
    Poirot - the series with David Suchet (because your first language is French, and he comes out with some French phrases at times that you will appreciate, rather than have mystify you - being in a supposedly English language film - as they might some of the forum members.)
    Miss Marple - with Joan Hicks. Not the travesty called "Marple".
    If you really like mysteries, that is!
    (Trouble is, in France, your using the Secam G system. I can't see why, in converting these videos for such a small non-English speaking, Secam-using market, the commercial DVDs would bother to include English subtitles. Do your DVD players have the capacity to play PAL videos - just like, over here, our DVD players will automatically play both PAL and NTSC discs?)
    Of the Jonathan Creeks: despite my youthful diet of Agatha Christie, I only solved one before Jonathan.

    **If you are puzzled, as me why this tense construction.
    *** If you are puzzled, ask me why no apostrophe.

    It behooves me, when I have some more time, to correct the erring grammar in your post.
    I keep taking note of your great posts, David.

    I am not having trouble with your sentences that are colored. They sound natural to me. That being said, you seem to think I make some mistakes - maybe more - and that is why I have got to come on this point.

    Indeed, I surely make some because of I keep writing fast almost as if I were speaking. This does train and help me when afterwards I stumble on English; for I will have to talk to them. Maybe that is not the best way to improve my skills in English but I am used to doing like this. Would you be able to give me a better way?

    However, I do thank you as usual, for I learn much from you and have the feeling that you are a kind man.

    To get back on our main subject, thank you once again for your advices. I may not answer to your questions at the moment due to I am not in my own home. Though, I do not know if I could get those series in France. As to James Bond, it will be no big deal.

    By the way, what is your favorite film ever? An advice on a book to read? Any kind! I will pick up the one that I would like.

    Thanks one more time


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    #8

    Re: difcicult to follow dialogues

    Proofreading. Proofreading. Proofreading.

    Oh, ughh, what words come out of one's fingertips as one types...with so many thoughts going on in one's head. That's why my posts get edited afterwards - I come back and proofread and make changes when my head is more removed from the page. My current post is somewhat different to the 'copy and paste' version you display.
    I will take full responsibility for what I (originally) said in moments of weakness and abstraction. (That's moi with the gun, in case anyone actually does think about taking me to task!)

    It's just that I 'save'/post my reply too quickly, ever since some bad experiences of typing for a while, and losing (for various reasons including power failure) what I'd typed. I'd prefer to use the wonderful 'edit' feature than have that happen again.
    Last edited by David L.; 13-Aug-2008 at 18:47.

  4. philadelphia's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: difcicult to follow dialogues

    Shame on me, I have omited the best part from you.

    David:
    So - we are looking for videos with a minimum of 'dialect' speech; that use 'correct' English rather than predominantly 'uneducated'; and that do not talk at some adrenalin-pumping rate that you're hard-pressed to catch the words.
    And 'films that nicely puzzle me'. (Brush up on the difference between using 'which' and 'that').
    Trouble is, when there's action included, the dialogue speeds up to match (and accelerate) the heart rate of the audience, which puts you back in the situation of the Action Movies you've been watching.

    I am definitely agree with you! You have succesfully guessed what I wanted to get. My English's skills are not good enough yet - as you said. Do you have a specific film that comes out? Unfortunately I come back to American's movies, I watched Forest Gump two months ago and was able to understand the most - to say no everything. Have you ever watched Forest Gump? If so, what did you think about the understanding of the speaking?

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    #10

    Re: difcicult to follow dialogues

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    It behooves me, when I have some more time, to correct the erring grammar in your post.
    I will be still grateful for it. By the by, nice to get more and more vocabulary from your post. Indeed, in my own language I deeply pay attention to the vocabulary, the sense of any word, the construction of each single sentence and whatnot

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