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    #1

    charged heavily

    The girl who shouted "A bomb! A bomb! Run for your life1" should be charged heavily as her prank had caused much inconvenience to every passenger who was taking the bus.

    Is 'charged heavily' correctly used?

    Many thanks.

  1. RonBee's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: charged heavily

    What does "charged heavily" mean? Charged with a crime?

    (Say:
    her prank caused much inconvenience to every passenger on the bus.)


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    #3

    Re: charged heavily

    Hi Ron Bee

    I want to know whether 'charged heavily' is the correct term for 'given a long prison term or fined a lot by the judge for the offence/crime'.

    Many thanks.

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    #4

    Re: charged heavily

    Is 'charged heavily' correctly used?

    'Charged heavily' in the context is understood to be charged by the police for a crime committed. Yes, that's correct usage.

    charge -
    6. to accuse formally or explicitly (usually fol. by with): They charged him with theft.
    not a teacher

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    #5

    Re: charged heavily

    With due respect, I wonder whether other members agree with the answer given by Ted.

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    #6

    Re: charged heavily

    A charge is only an accusation. A person is deemed to be innocent unless proven guilty in court. The punishment is meted out only when he/she is proven guilty.
    You could make it clearer by saying 'charged heavily in court'.


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    #7

    Re: charged heavily

    You can have a simple charge of 'murder' or 'kidnapping' and receive the death penalty. Another can have a slew of charges and be given a sentence of 6 months.

    It is not that the person in your quote should be 'charged' heavily, but punished heavily.

    Though, to be punished heavily, as many relevant charges as possible should be laid against her. Public nuisance, causing public disquiet, intent to cause panic and mayhem etc.

    We then say, "they should throw the book at her". This originally meant, charging a person with as many of the laws and rules in some imaginary (statute or otherwise) book as possible, though today it blends the ideas of both charging them with, and convicting them of these crimes or broken rules of conduct.

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    #8

    Re: charged heavily

    Hi David

    Your reply doesn't seem to address my question: Is charged heavily a correct term for referring to being given a long prison term or a hefty fine.

    Please correct any errors in my text. (Is 'text' correctly used to refer to what I've written?)

    Many thanks.


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    #9

    Re: charged heavily

    Tan Elaine:
    What all of the replies have been telling you is that one is 'charged' with a crime. This is an allegation which has to be proven in court. If so, the person is found 'guilty' of the charge/charges and then due punishment meted out.
    To be quite explicit: A 'charge' is not a punishment. A member of the public can allege that I have broken the law. When reported to the police, they gather the facts and then may lay a 'charge/charges' against me. A 'charge' is formally accusing me of a crime. Then, if I am found guilty in a court or law, the punishment is determined by the judge.

    You do not 'heavily charge' or 'charge heavily' -
    the judge can 'heavily punish' or 'punish heavily' a guilty person.

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