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    • Join Date: May 2007
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    #1

    Be Of????

    Dear Teachers

    I am glad that I found this forum, but I regretted I didnt find this forum eariler.

    This forum is very helpful. I am now more confident in English writing.

    Thanks for the teachers and the inventor of this forum, Very appreciated indeed.

    Here is a sentence which I dont understand very well

    " consultant will be in touch should your experience be of interest to our clients."

    Assuming "your experience" has to be the subject, and "our clients" be the object. How I link it up is
    "consultant will be in touch should your experience interests to our clients", or "



    "consultant will be in touch should our clients are interested in your experience"

    I just dont get the logic or particular meaning of "be of " in this senstence

    Could any teachers help me with that


    • Join Date: May 2007
    • Posts: 67
    #2

    Re: Be Of????

    Another separate question

    "we are most grateful for your interest and would be delighted to hear from you if any further opportunities appeal to you"

    I always thought "of" should be used in that sentence instead of "for"

    for example, it is very nice of you...., it is very sweet of you........


    am I right?

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    #3

    Re: Be Of????

    Do you mean this:
    "Our consultant will be in touch with you should your experience be of interest to our clients."

    grateful for, not 'of'

    not a teacher


    • Join Date: May 2007
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    #4

    Re: Be Of????

    tedtmc

    hi, the original sentence was dragged from a reply letter of job consultant agency, and what I dont understand is the use and meaning of " be of"

    you are always my post's feeder... many thanks

    haha

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    #5

    Re: Be Of????

    hi knowhat
    should your experience be of interest to our clients."
    It's another way of saying: if our clients are interested in your experience.

    should something be, not should something are
    - if something do/does

    of interest to our clients - interests our client


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
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    #6

    Re: Be Of????

    " consultant will be in touch should your experience be of interest to our clients."

    Look at this sentence:

    " consultant will be in touch if your experience should be of interest to our clients."

    the speaker is expressing an opinion, and is also speaking on behalf of someone else 'the consultant'. When we are politely expressing an opinion, the form is 'should' + bare infinite :
    "I'm sorry they are late. They should be here soon." - infinitive 'to be' - bare infinitive 'be'
    "The situation is becoming heated. I think you should go." - infinitive 'to go' - bare infinitive 'go'
    " A patient has the right to know. I think the doctor should tell him he's dying." -infinitive 'to tell' - bare infinitive 'tell'

    What is then happening in your sentence, is that, in formal or literary English, if the first verb in an 'if' clause is 'should' (or 'were' or 'had'), the verb can be put at the beginning of the clause, and the 'if' omitted:
    So - removing the 'if', and putting the 'should' first, we get your sentence:
    " consultant will be in touch should your experience be of interest to our clients."
    The construction is not to do with 'be of" - 'of' comes into it because we say:
    That is of interest to me.
    That might be of interest to him. - expressing a possibility
    "This book should be of interest to all those fascinated by steam trains." - It's my opinion that if you are interested in steam trains, you are very likely to find this book interesting.
    Last edited by David L.; 13-Aug-2008 at 13:20.


    • Join Date: May 2007
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    #7

    Re: Be Of????

    David L, and Tedtmc

    thanks for your clear and informative explanation.

    your patronized is appreciated (hehe I just learnt the word "patronize" and I hope I use it correctly)


    • Join Date: May 2007
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    #8

    Re: Be Of????

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    " consultant will be in touch should your experience be of interest to our clients."

    Look at this sentence:

    " consultant will be in touch if your experience should be of interest to our clients."

    the speaker is expressing an opinion, and is also speaking on behalf of someone else 'the consultant'. When we are politely expressing an opinion, the form is 'should' + bare infinite :
    "I'm sorry they are late. They should be here soon." - infinitive 'to be' - bare infinitive 'be'
    "The situation is becoming heated. I think you should go." - infinitive 'to go' - bare infinitive 'go'
    " A patient has the right to know. I think the doctor should tell him he's dying." -infinitive 'to tell' - bare infinitive 'tell'

    What is then happening in your sentence, is that, in formal or literary English, if the first verb in an 'if' clause is 'should' (or 'were' or 'had'), the verb can be put at the beginning of the clause, and the 'if' omitted:
    So - removing the 'if', and putting the 'should' first, we get your sentence:
    " consultant will be in touch should your experience be of interest to our clients."
    The construction is not to do with 'be of" - 'of' comes into it because we say:
    That is of interest to me.
    That might be of interest to him. - expressing a possibility
    "This book should be of interest to all those fascinated by steam trains." - It's my opinion that if you are interested in steam trains, you are very likely to find this book interesting.

    Thanks. but then, my second question arises.

    In your example, what is the meaning of "of"? can we say

    this is interesting (gerund) to me? (interesting expressing the feeling I got from X)
    That might be interesting to him?
    This book should be interesting to all those fascinated by steam trains?

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    #9

    Re: Be Of????

    your patronized is appreciated (hehe I just learnt the word "patronize" and I hope I use it correctly)
    That's not correct, knowhat.
    'Patronized' is a verb, not a noun which would fit into sentence.
    Your can say 'your patronage is appreciated', but that would mean something different altogether. That's what a shop attendant would say to a customer to thank the latter for his support.
    Just say: your help/explanation is appreciated.

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    #10

    Re: Be Of????

    this is interesting (gerund) to me?
    'Interesting' is an adjective, not a gerund which is a noun.
    Something which is interesting to you is the same as something which is of interest to you.

    another eg.
    You are concerned with your poor performance in the exam.
    can be rephrased as:
    Your poor performance in the exam is of concern to you.

    not a teacher

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