Results 1 to 9 of 9
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Germany
      • Current Location:
      • Sweden

    • Join Date: Feb 2008
    • Posts: 1,638
    #1

    booze

    Hi

    Do you ever say: He went to booze it up. Or do you use some other phrases to say it?



    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #2

    Re: booze

    No - to booze is to drink: He went to a booze-up = He went to a drinking party.

  1. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #3

    Re: booze

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    No - to booze is to drink: He went to a booze-up = He went to a drinking party.
    ...but 'booze' is also a noun ('I stopped on the way home to buy some booze'), and nouns are often (? anyway - not rarely) combined with '... it up' to make a verb - sometimes with an added sense of doing something to excess: a 'ham' actor "hams it up" for example; "jazz it up", "sex it up"...

    So if someone were to say "booze it up", it would probably be understood by analogy with some other "<noun> it up" expression.

    b

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Germany
      • Current Location:
      • Sweden

    • Join Date: Feb 2008
    • Posts: 1,638
    #4

    Re: booze

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    ...but 'booze' is also a noun ('I stopped on the way home to buy some booze'), and nouns are often (? anyway - not rarely) combined with '... it up' to make a verb - sometimes with an added sense of doing something to excess: a 'ham' actor "hams it up" for example; "jazz it up", "sex it up"...

    So if someone were to say "booze it up", it would probably be understood by analogy with some other "<noun> it up" expression.

    b
    Hi
    So, in your opinion "booze it up" is fine, because I'm not sure now.....

  2. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #5

    Re: booze

    Quote Originally Posted by GUEST2008 View Post
    Hi
    So, in your opinion "booze it up" is fine, because I'm not sure now.....
    I have that effect

    Take Anglika's advice.

    b


    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 810
    #6

    Re: booze

    Quote Originally Posted by GUEST2008 View Post
    Hi
    So, in your opinion "booze it up" is fine, because I'm not sure now.....
    I hear people say "booze it up" here in the U.K.

    It is very informal and not advisable, but people do say it.

    I say it is not advisable because A) it's not good English, and B) it normally means: to get very drunk.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Germany
      • Current Location:
      • Sweden

    • Join Date: Feb 2008
    • Posts: 1,638
    #7

    Re: booze

    Quote Originally Posted by colloquium View Post
    B) it normally means: to get very drunk.
    well, this is what I wanted to say....

  3. Ouisch's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2006
    • Posts: 4,142
    #8

    Re: booze

    In AmE, "booze it up" is acceptable (and fairly common usage).

    "Is the boss in yet?"
    "No, he was out boozing it up last night, so he's sleeping in today."

  4. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #9

    Re: booze

    Quote Originally Posted by GUEST2008 View Post
    well, this is what I wanted to say....
    In that case, it's common - in informal speech - to speak of the result :

    [Depending on register, and how drunk he got]

    He got tiddly/drunk [as a skunk]/rolling drunk/pie-eyed/p*ssed* [as a newt]/legless/smashed/trolleyed [a reference, I think, to being put on a trolley in an A&E department]

    b

    *This is an interesting UK/US difference. In Am E the same word means "angry" - which in Br E is "p*ssed off"

Similar Threads

  1. He's been on the booze?
    By sky753 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-Sep-2007, 10:02

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •