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    #1

    Have you ever seen/watched

    1. Have you ever seen a Korean movie?
    2. Have you ever watched a Korean movie?
    3. Have you ever seen a Korean TV program?
    4. Have you ever watched a Korean TV program?
    Which of the sentences are not acceptable?
    Thank you very much for your reply.


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    #2

    Re: Have you ever seen/watched

    I am not a teacher

    In everyday English, I can tell you, that both are perfectly acceptable and no one would correct you for using either of these sentences. "I have never watched" may offer a clearer understanding that you have never sat down and watched a Korean film all the way through but that maybe you have "seen" one, say on a poster advertising it or similar, but you have not actually "watched" one all the way through. But as I say, no person speaking English would ever correct you on this point as they would undertstand both phrases perfectly well.
    Last edited by Gerry M; 15-Aug-2008 at 16:35. Reason: I reconsidered my answer

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    #3

    Re: Have you ever seen/watched

    According to Michael Swan's Practical English Usage (p493, third edition),
    1. Have you ever seen Chaplin's "The Great Dictator" (correct)
    2. Have you ever watched Chaplin's "The Great Dictator" (incorrect)
    Swan's explanation is as follows:
    Watch is typically used to talk about experiences that are going on, in progress.
    We often prefer see to talk about the whole of a performance, play, cinema film, match etc.
    Compare:
    He got into a fight yesterday afternoon while he was watching a football match. (NOT ... while he was seeing a football match.)
    Have you ever seen Chaplin's "The Great Dictator"? (NOT Have you ever watched Chaplin's "The Great Dictator"?)

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    #4

    Re: Have you ever seen/watched

    Quote Originally Posted by sitifan View Post
    According to Michael Swan's Practical English Usage (p493, third edition),
    1. Have you ever seen Chaplin's "The Great Dictator" (correct)
    2. Have you ever watched Chaplin's "The Great Dictator" (incorrect)
    Swan's explanation is as follows:
    Watch is typically used to talk about experiences that are going on, in progress.
    We often prefer see to talk about the whole of a performance, play, cinema film, match etc.
    Compare:
    He got into a fight yesterday afternoon while he was watching a football match. (NOT ... while he was seeing a football match.)
    Have you ever seen Chaplin's "The Great Dictator"? (NOT Have you ever watched Chaplin's "The Great Dictator"?)
    Hi, sitifan!

    Mine(Practical English Usage - SECOND Edition, p512)says:

    5 watch TV

    Watch is normally used with TV; watch and see are both used to talk about TV programmes and films.

    You spend too much time watching TV.
    We watched/saw a great film on TV last night.
    Did you watch/see 'Top of the Pops' on Thursday?


    Well...this one is a really interesting topic.
    Swan says,
    "We often prefer see to talk about the whole of a performance, play, cinema film, match etc."
    He doesn't say "We must use..." or "We never say..."

    1. Have you ever seen Chaplin's "The Great Dictator"
    2. Have you ever watched Chaplin's "The Great Dictator"

    They both are probably OK. Does he really say 'correct' or 'incorrect' in your edition?

    Please forgive me if I'm wrong.
    I'm not a native speaker of English.

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