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  1. Offroad's Avatar
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    #1

    equation

    Please, dear teachers, could you help me out with this?

    I am trying to speak an equation, so I'd like to know how to do that.

    The equations is:

    And this is my shot/try:

    open brace, P plus a (times) n square over v square close brace, open parenthesis, V minus n (times) b, close parenthesis, is equal to n (times) R (times) T.

    where '(times)' is optional.

    So, Is that right and usual?

    Thank you
    Last edited by Offroad; 15-Aug-2008 at 23:38.

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    #2

    Re: equation

    open parenthesis, V minus n (times) b, close parenthesis

    could also be:

    (V-n x b)

    So I would not use the word "times"

    I'd call it "nb"

  2. Offroad's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: equation

    How'd you call this:

    a) 2^3 = 8
    b) 2^4 = 16
    c) 2^5 = 32
    d) 2^n

    Thank you in advance


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    #4

    Re: equation

    open parenthesis, V minus n (times) b, close parenthesis

    could also be:

    (V-n x b)


    That is the equation given by marciobarbalho. Multiplication takes precedence over subtraction. Did you mean:

    (V-n) times b; or b(V-n)

    The relocation of the parenthesis takes care of that.

    a) 2^3 = 8
    2 (to the) (raised to the) third power equals 8
    ...to the fourth power/to the fifth power/to the nth power
    Last edited by David L.; 18-Aug-2008 at 20:57.

  3. Offroad's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: equation

    The equation is (V - nb) or (V - n*b).

    In Portuguese, we usually call x^2 like this:
    x square.
    Do people always call it like that?

    where 'square' is related to two equal sides of something, x*x

    x^3 is very common people say something related to 'cube', meaning 3 equal sides of something.
    How'd you call that in English?

    x^4 is called "raised to the fourth power"

    Thank you.


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    #6

    Re: equation

    Yes, X squared, x^2 or X2 (except the 2 should be at the top of the X, not the bottom) is easy, as is X cubed. But from then on, 'to the power of', or X to the fourth' is usual, than something like 'X quadrupled' which is a mouthful.

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: equation

    I wouldn't call the square brackets "braces"; in my understanding a brace is a curly bracket ({}). But I'm not a mathematician or a physicist, and I don't know whether they observe different conventions.

    And a quantity raised to the power 2 is - in Br E at least - "squareD".

    b

  5. Offroad's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: equation

    Then, x^2 is called x squared and x^3 is called x cubed. From then on, x to the th-power.

    Thank you guys.

  6. BobK's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: equation

    Quote Originally Posted by marciobarbalho View Post
    Then, x^2 is called x squared and x^3 is called x cubed. From then on, x to the th-power.

    Thank you guys.
    '...to the Nth power' will never be wrong; sometimes, though, it's shortened to '...to the Nth'.

    b

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    #10

    Re: equation

    Further reflection about that "sometimes". I think it's more common to keep the word "power" when talking about larger numbers - the time since the Big Bang will be 't to the Nth power', but N^5 may well be expressed as "N to the fifth".

    b

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