Results 1 to 8 of 8
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil

    • Join Date: Aug 2008
    • Posts: 351
    #1

    catch a fright

    Hello,

    In the sentence below what does "catch a fright" mean?


    They trip over us and knock into us and catch a fright when they suddenly see the dog and so on.

    Thanks in advance


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #2

    Re: catch a fright

    Were suddenly surprised.

    The sentence looks like something from a children's book.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil

    • Join Date: Aug 2008
    • Posts: 351
    #3

    Re: catch a fright

    Hello Anglika,

    In fact, I would like to know what "catch a fright'' means. The exemple above is illustrative.

    thanks


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #4

    Re: catch a fright

    It is not a collocation I recognise. If you made it up, then it means what you want it to mean.

    Usually one would say: Have a fright = to be startled or Be frightened

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,000
    #5

    Re: catch a fright

    I'm not a teacher.

    Hi dilermando,

    It came into my mind for one very acceptable interpretation of the phrase “catch a fright” with reference to “stage fright”.

    I know the following meaning of the idiom “stage fright” = “acute nervousness associated with performing or speaking before an audience” as in “When John first had to present his findings to the board of directors, stage fright made him stutter.”

    There are a few examples with literal (usual) meaning of the phrase “cathch a fright” = “take a fright” = “to become frightened usually suddenly and quickly”

    I was driven out there yesterday to catch a fright and it took one hour and fifteen minutes on almost empty and well paved roads, and on a Friday afternoon. ...

    Well, I try not to flinch... but I easily catch fright!

    Creepers and lurkers, creatures of night, come spin the wheel, mind you dont catch fright!

    The Fool had risen from his chair and was standing leaning
    forward, his back black against the blazing fire, his silly
    mouth agape and great terror in his eyes.Being odd in his mind,
    he felt perhaps something in the air that the others did not
    feel, and Peter seemed to catch fright from his staring eyes.
    Regards

    V.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Tuvalu
      • Current Location:
      • Tuvalu

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 1,860
    #6

    Re: catch a fright

    Hi,
    I'd like to know what's the verb to be used with the word "fright" in this context, please. Suppose someone comes sneaking behind you and suddenly yells "buu!" at your ears. You'll probably jump off your seat and your heart beat will go up. That's a "fright", right? The guy who caused you feel the fright performed an action with ''fright''. What's the verb that better fits this action, please? Did the guy "give" you a fright? Did he ''make'' you a fright? "Caused"? Did he "get" you a fright?

    How about this one, please: "I opened the door and there was that huge man staring at me. I got a terrible fright!".

    Thanks!
    Last edited by jctgf; 17-Aug-2008 at 01:29.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil

    • Join Date: Aug 2008
    • Posts: 351
    #7

    Re: catch a fright

    Quote Originally Posted by jctgf View Post
    Hi,
    I'd like to know what's the verb to be used with the word "fright" in this context, please. Suppose someone comes sneaking behind you and suddenly yells "buu!" at your ears. You'll probably jump off your seat and your heart beat will go up. That's a "fright", right? The guy who caused you feel the fright performed an action with ''fright''. What's the verb that better fits this action, please? Did the guy "give" you a fright? Did he ''make'' you a fright? "Caused"? Did he "get" you a fright?

    How about this one, please: "I opened the door and there was that huge man staring at me. I got a terrible fright!".

    Thanks!
    I would like to do the same question.

    Thanks!


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #8

    Re: catch a fright

    He frightened you and you had a fright.

Similar Threads

  1. Is it a catch??
    By anreak in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 16-Jan-2008, 21:59
  2. It's hard to catch on
    By angliholic in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-Nov-2007, 00:48
  3. catch one doing
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 24-Sep-2007, 18:29
  4. to catch up on
    By Bolo in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-Apr-2005, 03:40
  5. Catch up
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 26-Jun-2003, 22:52

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •