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  1. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #1

    Smile I am Mrs. Simpson (Self-introducing)

    Hi there!

    My teacher of English taught us that we can not call ourselves Mr/Ms/Mrs/ Miss with our surnames when we introduce ourselves to others. I can say, "I am Mary. / I am Mary Simpson./ I am Simpson."

    But why did a woman introduce herself to a babysitter by saying, "I am Mrs. Simpson."?

    Thanks in advance!
    Last edited by thedaffodils; 16-Aug-2008 at 12:52. Reason: Simpons-> Simpson

  2. Soup's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: I am Mrs. Simpsons (Self-introducing)

    To tell the sitter that she, Mrs. Simpson, is the mother; i.e., Mrs. means female married partner.

  3. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #3

    Smile Re: I am Mrs. Simpsons (Self-introducing)

    Hi Soup,

    Thank you for your answer. But is it okay for the self-introducing of Mary?

    ******************

    (Soup and Mary Simpson met in a party.)

    Soup: Hi! I'm Soup. Nice to meet you.

    Mary: Nice to meet you too. I'm Miss Mary Simpson.
    Last edited by thedaffodils; 16-Aug-2008 at 12:53. Reason: Simpsons-->Simpson

  4. Soup's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: I am Mrs. Simpsons (Self-introducing)

    When people use their title in introducing themselves it's usually for a reason. For example,

    Sue: Hi! I'm Sue, John Smith's girlfriend.
    Mary: Hi! I'm Mrs. Smith, John's wife.


    Max: Hello. I'm Max, and I'm single.
    Sam: Hello. I'm Mrs. Sam Todd. (married obviously)


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    #5

    Re: I am Mrs. Simpsons (Self-introducing)

    Whenever you give a person your first name in an introduction, you are indicating that you are 'equals', or regard/wish to relate to the other person as an 'equal'.
    Compare when you go so see a doctor. He says, "Hello. I'm Dr. Smith". If you arranged an appointment with a bank manager, he might introduce himself as "Mr. Smith". It means that this is a 'business' relationship.

    So, if the woman introduces herself to the babysitter as "I'm Mrs. Simpson", it means, 'we are not starting a friendship here. You are working for me as an employee. I respect you - but there is a 'distance' that I wish to maintain'.

  5. Soup's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: I am Mrs. Simpsons (Self-introducing)

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post

    So, if the woman introduces herself to the babysitter as "I'm Mrs. Simpson", it means, 'we are not starting a friendship here. You are working for me as an employee. I respect you - but there is a 'distance' that I wish to maintain'.
    Perhaps more so in the UK.

  6. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #7

    Smile Re: I am Mrs. Simpsons (Self-introducing)

    Soup & David L.:

    Thank you very much for your answers.
    Last edited by thedaffodils; 16-Aug-2008 at 12:31.


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    #8

    Re: I am Mrs. Simpsons (Self-introducing)

    Perhaps more so in the UK.

    So - why in your part of the world would a woman introduce herself to the babysitter as "I'm Mrs. Simpson." It can't be to convey that she is not a "Mr".
    Is it to show that she's not just some next door neighbour? She is one of the 'Simpsons' who live there.
    Is it because Mr. Simpson has done all the arranging with the babysitter, and she is thus acknowledging, "I'm the wife of the person whom you have made all the arrangements with'?
    Why doesn't she say, "I'm Mary Simpson."?
    That's what the daffodils asked.
    why did a woman introduce herself to a babysitter by saying, "I am Mrs. Simpsons

  7. Soup's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: I am Mrs. Simpsons (Self-introducing)

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    Perhaps more so in the UK.

    So - why in your part of the world would a woman introduce herself to the babysitter as "I'm Mrs. Simpson."
    I believe this has already been answered.

    Quote Originally Posted by David L.
    It can't be to convey that she is not a "Mr".
    Rhetorical, no doubt, but otherwise bating and unacceptable, especially if you are a teacher.

    Quote Originally Posted by David L.
    Is it to show that she's not just some next door neighbour?
    Or an aunt, maybe an older sister, the housekeeper. The options are there. (You've answered your own question).

    ___________________
    Grammar tickler

    She is one of the 'Simpsons' who live/lives there.
    "Don't you think," said Bernard, "that Hawaii is one of those places that was always better in the past." (from David Lodge, 1991)
    Burchfield adds, "A plural verb in the subordinate clause is recommended unless particular attention is being drawn to the uniqueness, individuality, etc., of the one in the opening clause." In an earlier note, Burchfield writes: "Exceptions [to the rule that we use the plural verb] occur when the writer or speaker presumably regards one as governing the verb in the subordinate clause," and he gives another two or three examples, including "I am one of those people who wants others to do what I think they should."

    *The New Fowler's Modern English Usage edited by R.W. Burchfield. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England. 1996. Used with the permission of Oxford University Press. p. 551.

  8. Soup's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: I am Mrs. Simpsons (Self-introducing)

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    Why doesn't she say, "I'm Mary Simpson."?
    That's what the daffodils asked.
    There is no indication of that in post #1, and if the poster would like to know, she will ask. Assumptions and all that, right?

    ___________________
    Punctuation question:
    is [1] a UK variant of [2]?

    North American English Punctuation
    [1] Why doesn't she say, "I'm Mary Simpson."?
    [2] Why doesn't she say, "I'm Mary Simpson"?

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