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    • Join Date: Jul 2005
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    #1

    time for greeting

    When do you use 'good evening' to greet someone? I was told sometime ago that you start to use that around 4 o'clock however I just read that you should start at 6 o'clock. so which is right?


    • Join Date: May 2008
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    #2

    Re: time for greeting

    Quote Originally Posted by fazidahrusli View Post
    When do you use 'good evening' to greet someone? I was told sometime ago that you start to use that around 4 o'clock however I just read that you should start at 6 o'clock. so which is right?
    I think it depends on where you live. Different countries have different customs.

    Here in England, I think from roughly 6:00 onwards is usually considered evening.

    I am not a teacher.

  1. gayanah's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: time for greeting

    Quote Originally Posted by fazidahrusli View Post
    When do you use 'good evening' to greet someone? I was told sometime ago that you start to use that around 4 o'clock however I just read that you should start at 6 o'clock. so which is right?
    Good evening
    In my country now evening and I can greet you like this.
    We use this greeting since 5 to 6 o'clock.To be correct we use 17.00 to 18.00.
    Not a teacher.

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    #4

    Re: time for greeting

    Hello,

    Here in Brazil we don't have a term like 'good evening'. After the sun goes down we usually say 'good night'.

    I am not a teacher.


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    #5

    Re: time for greeting



    interesting. as a teacher of english in malaysia, this is very interesting. for good night is always used when u are going to bed or that would be the last time u see that person for that day.















    Quote Originally Posted by dilermando View Post
    Hello,

    Here in Brazil we don't have a term like 'good evening'. After the sun goes down we usually say 'good night'.

    I am not a teacher.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: time for greeting

    Quote Originally Posted by dilermando View Post
    Hello,

    Here in Brazil we don't have a term like 'good evening'. After the sun goes down we usually say 'good night'.

    I am not a teacher.
    That's interesting. All the other Romance languages have a term: Buona sera, bonsoir, buenas tardes. How did Portuguese miss out?

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: time for greeting

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    That's interesting. All the other Romance languages have a term: Buona sera, bonsoir, buenas tardes. How did Portuguese miss out?
    Continental Portuguese didn't: boa tarde. Perhaps it's something to do ^with^ the speed of sunset in Brasil. (The position of the sun is quite important. In the South of England, in summer-time, I might say 'Good evening' rather than 'Good night' until after 9.00 p.m.; in the North of Scotland, in mid-winter, they might say 'Good evening' rather than 'Good afternoon' as early as 4.00 p.m. There's no rule of thumb.)

    b

    PS I've edited the first line - sorry for the slip
    Last edited by BobK; 20-Aug-2008 at 11:38. Reason: PS added

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    #8

    Re: time for greeting

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Continental Portuguese didn't: boa tarde. Perhaps it's something to do the speed of sunset in Brasil. (The position of the sun is quite important. In the South of England, in summer-time, I might say 'Good evening' rather than 'Good night' until after 9.00 p.m.; in the North of Scotland, in mid-winter, they might say 'Good evening' rather than 'Good afternoon' as early as 4.00 p.m. There's no rule of thumb.)

    b

    Hi there, I din't meant to cause this discussion. Let me say some words. Brazil is big. I was born in southern region, and now I live in Sao Paulo. There are no greetings here! Just hello!, opa! Of course, in informal converstion.
    Bom dia=good morning is said during the morning.
    Boa tarde= good afternoon. If you come in Brazil, probably you'll never hear this greeting, unless you go in the countryside, for exemple, or during a formal meeting. I don't remember when I heard good afternoon last time.
    Boa noite= good night. We say good night when we arrive and we say good night when we leave too. There's no rule!

    Best regards!
    Last edited by dilermando; 19-Aug-2008 at 19:40. Reason: complete information

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