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    #1

    acquaint gracefully?

    Hello Everyone,

    Theodore Roszak, a theorist and writer , holds the opinions that thinking occurs on different levels. The lowest level of them is data processing or information process, which is similar to that on which computer works. In a interview he thinks kids should be informed that most of the time what our mind occurs while thinking is higher levels of thinking, like intuition, judgment ect.

    And in the interview, Theodore Roszak use gracefully to modify the acquainting! I am wondering why the author use the modifier as I find it difficult to translated it into proper and equivalent Chinese. In Chinese, it seems to me that, there is no such saying--gracefully acquainting?

    "What I'm trying to defend is the idea that thinking takes place on many levels. And the lowest level of all is data processing or information processing. And it worries me if we try to sell people on the idea, and especially kids in the classroom that what they are doing when they are thinking is essentially something that should be modeled upon what a computer does. Well, I think that's a disaster because it is lowering the capacities of the human mind to the lowest levels of thinking rather than acquainting kids gracefully and critically with all the higher levels of thinking that we normally go through in the course of every day of our life."


    Regards

    Sky

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    #2

    Re: acquaint gracefully?

    He is concerned that the overuse of computers will prevent children from going through those processes that help them learn about life.

    He wants kids to become acquainted with life, gracefully and critically, exposing them to all the higher levels of thinking that we normally go through in the course of every day of our life."

    "gracefully" would mean slowly, with ease, style, fun and with self-thought.

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    #3

    Re: acquaint gracefully?

    Quote Originally Posted by susiedqq View Post
    He is concerned that the overuse of computers will prevent children from going through those processes that help them learn about life.

    He wants kids to become acquainted with life, gracefully and critically, exposing them to all the higher levels of thinking that we normally go through in the course of every day of our life."

    "gracefully" would mean slowly, with ease, style, fun and with self-thought.
    Thank you! Susiedqq!

    From your reply, the essential meaning of acquainting kids gracefully and critically with all the higher levels of thinking that we normally go through in the course of every day of our life." is kids should be acquainted with life
    , while from the original passage, I feel the central meaning of the sentence is Kids should be acquainted with the high level of thinking?

    Can you clarify?

    And with regards to acquainting kids gracefully and critically with all the higher levels of thinking, can I comprehend it as children should be made familar with the higher levels of thinking slowly and making them familiar with such thinking is of the greatest importance ?

    And is the essential meaning of gracefully is slowly?

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    #4

    Re: acquaint gracefully?

    Gracefully and critically is the "how" of the acquainting process.

    Don't forget - he is talking about opposite of computer learning, which he probably thinks is jerky, quick, overly stimulating, isolated and lacking in much-needed social interaction - the very opposite of graceful and critical learning!

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    #5

    Re: acquaint gracefully?

    Quote Originally Posted by susiedqq View Post
    Gracefully and critically is the "how" of the acquainting process.

    Don't forget - he is talking about opposite of computer learning, which he probably thinks is jerky, quick, overly stimulating, isolated and lacking in much-needed social interaction - the very opposite of graceful and critical learning!
    Dear Susiedqq,

    Many thanks for your time! But the main idea of the passage is human thinking and computer thinking, and the paragraph I have quoted seems have little connection with learning?

    And another question is the central meaning of graceful is slowly?



    Regards

    Sky

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    #6

    Re: acquaint gracefully?

    Quote Originally Posted by susiedqq View Post
    Gracefully and critically is the "how" of the acquainting process.

    Don't forget - he is talking about opposite of computer learning, which he probably thinks is jerky, quick, overly stimulating, isolated and lacking in much-needed social interaction - the very opposite of graceful and critical learning!
    Hi Susiedqq,

    The is the original passsage:

    There have been over the ages many models of the mind. The mind is an empty vessel, waiting to be filled; or the mind is a machine, breaking down sometimes. Nowadays, the mind is often described as being a computer, processing information. Writer and social theorist Theodore Rozak disputes that model in his book The Cult of Information . He says that the word is over-used, and the mind works more by juggling ideas than sifting through information. In fact, says Rozak, some of the most important ideas have no information at all.
    "The example I use most prominently in the book is one that should be of ... familiar enough to all Americans: 'All men are created equal.' Very powerful idea, has absolutely no connection with information. The people who developed that idea and used it for revolutionary purposes were not drawing upon some body of research, some facts and figures about the whole human race. That's not what that idea is based upon. It's based upon experience and upon moral vision. And there are so many ideas like that, and I try to remind people, in this critique, that most of what's going through their mind when they're thinking most of the time, the run of ideas that they've learned from the cradle on up, many of which are matters of wisdom, of judgment, of insight, of intuition that have nothing to do with facts and figures or with information."
    "You write on page 213, you say, 'What I am suggesting is that in little things and big, the mind works more by way of Gestalt than by algorithmic processes. That is because our life as a whole is made up of the hierarchy of projects, some trivial and repetitive, some special and spectacular. Pondering choices, making projects: these are the mind's first order of business. This is so obvious, so basic that perhaps we are only prompted to reflect upon it when a different idea about thinking is presented, such as that thought is connecting data points in formal sequences."
    "What I'm trying to defend is the idea that thinking takes place on many levels. And the lowest level of all is data processing or information processing. And it worries me if we try to sell people on the idea, and especially kids in the classroom that what they are doing when they are thinking is essentially something that should be modeled upon what a computer does. Well, I think that's a disaster because it is lowering the capacities of the human mind to the lowest levels of thinking rather than acquainting kids gracefully and critically with all the higher levels of thinking that we normally go through in the course of every day of our life."
    "All right. There are things that are subjective. There are things like creativity and intuition. But suppose that our experience of those things that is what we experience on the subjective level; on another level, the level that scientists study, these things are in fact productions and outcomes of conscious computational processes."
    "As a hypothesis, it's perfectly respectable. The problem is that people working in the field of artificial intelligence have found themselves, willingly or not, linked to a piece of machinery, a computer which they use as their model. I think this has had a very corrupting influence upon people working in the academies, in the field of artificial intelligence. It links them with a massive vested economic interest in our society which is out to sell computers for every purpose you can think of, from string recipes in your kitchen at home to running the Star Wars anti-ballistic missile defensive system.
    "And yet, if you muck about with people who are doing artificial intelligence, some of the discussions are the most fascinating discussions I've ever had in my life."
    "The people in artificial intelligence have been making promises of the highest level for a very long period of time and always telling us that the great breakthrough in their field is going to happen within the next few years, three years, five years, something of that sort. You know, my question to the people in that field is a very simple one, you know. Deliver the goods, show us that you can do it. And my suspicion is that it can't be done, because they're using the wrong model of the human mind. Well, we could go on disputing that academically for a very long period of time. The fact is they're already involved in selling that idea to the public as a form of machinery out there in the world."
    Theodore Rozak is author of The Cult of Information : The Folklore of Computers and the True Art of Thinking .


    Regards

    Sky

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