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  1. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #1

    Smile outlaw vs. illegalize

    Hi!

    Could someone illustrate what the difference between 'outlaw' and 'illegalize'?

    And can I replace 'outlaw' with 'illegalize' in the following sentence? If not, why?

    eg. Denials of Jewish holocaust have been outlawed.

    Thanks!

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: outlaw vs. illegalize

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    Hi!

    Could someone illustrate what the difference between 'outlaw' and 'illegalize'?

    And can I replace 'outlaw' with 'illegalize' in the following sentence? If not, why?

    eg. Denials of Jewish holocaust have been outlawed.

    Thanks!
    Certainly. Though "Denial of the Jewish holocaust has been outlawed." sounds better.

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: outlaw vs. illegalize

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    Hi!

    Could someone illustrate what the difference between 'outlaw' and 'illegalize'?

    And can I replace 'outlaw' with 'illegalize' in the following sentence? If not, why?

    eg. Denials of Jewish holocaust have been outlawed.

    Thanks!
    Note that "illegalize" is an American word which you are unlikely to encounter in the UK where "outlaw" and "criminalize" are the usual terms.

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: outlaw vs. illegalize

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Note that "illegalize" is an American word which you are unlikely to encounter in the UK where "outlaw" and "criminalize" are the usual terms.
    I knew I passed over that question for a reason! I couldn't think of criminalise .
    I note you use "ize" bhaisahab. Have you given up the good fight?

  5. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: outlaw vs. illegalize

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    I knew I passed over that question for a reason! I couldn't think of criminalise .
    I note you use "ize" bhaisahab. Have you given up the good fight?
    No, I haven't really given up, in fact, I put "ise" first, then considered "ise/ize", finally I went with "ize" because it is increasingly being written like that.

  6. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #6

    Smile Re: outlaw vs. illegalize

    Raymott & Bhaisahab, thank you for your responses.

  7. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: outlaw vs. illegalize

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Note that "illegalize" is an American word which you are unlikely to encounter in the UK where "outlaw" and "criminalize" are the usual terms.

    ... and lots of near-synonyms, often depending on the column-width of the newspaper! 'Ban' 'Veto' 'Rule out'.

    Although it's not usual for 'illegalize' in Br E, we do use 'legalize' - "pressure is growing for cannabis to be legalized".

    Note that the verb 'outlaw' is ^sometimes*^ stressed on the second syllable; the noun (the person who has been outlawed) is ^always^ stressed on the first.

    b

    *See my later note: https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/a...tml#post340499
    Last edited by BobK; 21-Aug-2008 at 11:11. Reason: Note added

  8. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #8

    Smile Re: outlaw vs. illegalize

    Hi BobK,

    Thank you for your answer with details!

  9. BobK's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: outlaw vs. illegalize

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    ...
    I note you use "ize" bhaisahab. Have you given up the good fight?
    "Good"? For many years I've been fighting the good fight of persuading people that - in Br English, at least - "-ize" (in words where it's an option, unlike for example 'televise', 'surprise'...) is not an Americanism. It's been many respectable UK publishers' house-style for over a century.

    As I said, there are cases where -ize is not an option. So always using '-ise' involves less effort. Perhaps that's why some some dialects prefer it (having given up "the good fight" that requires a bit more effort. )

    b

  10. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #10

    Smile Re: outlaw vs. illegalize

    Microsoft Word Processor has a function of spell-checking. It outlaws verbs with the suffix of 'ise' by underlining them but 'ize'.

    It should blame it on Bill Gates.

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