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    #1

    are prohibiting or prohibit?are trying or try

    Hi, I'd like to know whether I should use the progressive or the simple form of the verb in the following sentences. Thanks Rip

    Conservation organizations are trying (try) to solve pandas' problems. In fact, they prohibit (are prohibiting) the destruction of the pandas' habitat.

  1. paochai01's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: are prohibiting or prohibit?are trying or try

    Quote Originally Posted by ripley View Post
    Hi, I'd like to know whether I should use the progressive or the simple form of the verb in the following sentences. Thanks Rip

    Conservation organizations are trying (try) to solve pandas' problems. In fact, they prohibit (are prohibiting) the destruction of the pandas' habitat.
    Not a teacher

    I'd use progressive. However, I would use the Simple Present in the following conditions:
    1. To express the idea that an action is repeated/usual
    2. The action can be a habit, a hobby, a daily event, a scheduled event or something that often happens.
    3. To indicate that the speaker believes that a fact was true before, is true now, and will be true in the future (but it is not important if the speaker is correct about the fact)
    4. To make generalizations about people or things.
    5. (Sometimes) To express the idea that an action is happening or is not happening now. (only with Non-Continuous Verbs and certain Mixed Verbs)

    The sentence above expresses that the organization is in the process of doing a longer action which is in progress; however, the organization might not be doing it at this exact second.

    Other uses of present progressive:
    1. If you want to express the idea that something is happening or not happening now, at this very moment.

    Remember that "now" can mean: this second, today, this month, this year, this century, and so on.

    But don't confuse with simple present as the present continuous with words such as "always" or "constantly" expresses the idea that something irritating or shocking often happens. Notice that the meaning is like Simple Present, but with negative emotion. Remember to put the words "always" or "constantly" between "be" and "verb+ing."

    Remember that it is important to remember that Non-Continuous Verbs cannot be used in any continuous tenses. Also, certain non-continuous meanings for Mixed Verbs cannot be used in continuous tenses. Instead of using Present Continuous with these verbs, you must use Simple Present.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: are prohibiting or prohibit?are trying or try

    Quote Originally Posted by ripley View Post
    Hi, I'd like to know whether I should use the progressive or the simple form of the verb in the following sentences. Thanks Rip

    Conservation organizations are trying (try) to solve pandas' problems. In fact, they prohibit (are prohibiting) the destruction of the pandas' habitat.
    I'd use "trying", and "prohibit". Both are acceptable; they depend on your emphasis here.
    In the first case, I'd emphasise the ongoing nature of the "trying".
    In the second, the prohibition has already been put in place, though the policing is still ongoing. You could even use "have prohibited".

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