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    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,344
    #1

    For

    Are these correct? What do these mean?

    1. Talk to you for a minute?
    2. Talk to you a minute?

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #2

    Re: For

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    Are these correct? What do these mean?

    1. Talk to you for a minute?
    2. Talk to you a minute?
    EX: Can I talk to you (for) a minute?

    'for' is often omitted (...), especially if it can be picked up in the context. That is, 'for a minute' is a set phrase. :wink:


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,344
    #3
    What do these mean?
    1. The store is opened for 24 hours.
    2. The store is opened 24 hours.

  2. TheMadBaron
    Guest
    #4
    1. The store is opened for 24 hours.

    When the 24 hours are over, the store will be closed, since 24 hours is how long it will be open for.

    2. The store is opened 24 hours.

    The store never closes.


    Number two isn't quite right, though. It should be -
    The store is open 24 hours.
    Or, better yet -
    2. The store is open 24 hours a day.

  3. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    What do these mean?
    1. The store is opened for 24 hours.
    2. The store is opened 24 hours.
    The store is open. :wink:


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,344
    #6
    The store is open.
    I don't understand why it isn't 'opened'. How do you know that this 'to-be' sentence doesn't need to add -ed to 'open?

    Are these correct?
    1. How do you know that this 'to-be' sentence doesn't need to add -ed to 'open?
    2. How do you know this 'to-be' sentence doesn't need to add -ed to 'open?

  4. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    The store is open.
    I don't understand why it isn't 'opened'. How do you know that this 'to-be' sentence doesn't need to add -ed to 'open?

    Are these correct?
    1. How do you know that this 'to-be' sentence doesn't need to add -ed to 'open?
    2. How do you know this 'to-be' sentence doesn't need to add -ed to 'open?
    Past Participle: The store is opened. (Passive)
    Adjective: The store is open. (Active)

    There are two words open: 1) The verb open , which has a past participle, opened, and 2) the adjective open.

  5. TheMadBaron
    Guest
    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    Are these correct?
    1. How do you know that this 'to-be' sentence doesn't need to add -ed to 'open?
    2. How do you know this 'to-be' sentence doesn't need to add -ed to 'open?
    You're asking whether to use 'that' or not?

    I'd say they're both correct. 2 is grammatically more correct, but 1 is more common.

    I tend to speak like 1 and write like 2.

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    #9

    Re: For

    Out of curiosity, why do you say the second more correct than the first. I can't see much between them.
    Last edited by Tdol; 30-Oct-2004 at 15:50. Reason: typo


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,344
    #10

    Re: For

    Thanks.

    What is the difference in meaning between these two? When would I use the first one?
    1. Past Participle: The store is opened. (Passive)
    2. Adjective: The store is open. (Active)

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