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    #1

    requesting more help on had

    So far in this forums, I have had good discussions on the subject of Had. Now I would like to continue more up on this.. :)

    Take the case of a student who read in a college from 2002 to 2006. In 2008, what should he say between the following?: I had good relations with my teachers or I have had good relations with my teachers.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    I had a book --- I used to have book, but not any more.
    I had cordial relationship with him --- Even this means that relationship no more holds?

    I have cordial relationship with him.. this is again clear for me. This talks about the current status.

    Please explain the above contexts in which Have Had and Had are used.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: requesting more help on had

    Quote Originally Posted by kiranlegend View Post
    So far in this forums, I have had good discussions on the subject of Had. Now I would like to continue more up on this.. :)

    Take the case of a student who read in a college from 2002 to 2006. In 2008, what should he say between the following?: I had good relations with my teachers or I have had good relations with my teachers.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    I had a book --- I used to have book, but not any more.
    I had cordial relationship with him --- Even this means that relationship no more holds?

    I have cordial relationship with him.. this is again clear for me. This talks about the current status.

    Please explain the above contexts in which Have Had and Had are used.
    Take the case of a student who read in a college from 2002 to 2006. In 2008, what should he say between the following?: I had good relations with my teachers or I have had good relations with my teachers.

    I had good relations with my teachers. This is past, I no longer have this relationship. This is appropriate because in your example the relationship ended in 2006.

    I had a book --- I used to have a book, but not any more.
    I had a cordial relationship with him --- Even this means that relationship no more holds?

    I have a cordial relationship with him.. this is again clear for me. This talks about the current status.

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    #3

    Re: requesting more help on had

    so far on this forums, I have had good discussions on the subject of Had. What about this?

    Continuing the above case, if the person is still in touch with his teachers even though he completed his education in 2006, then which of the following is appropriate to say?:

    I have had good relations with the teachers

    or

    I have good relations with the teachers

    I know the latter doubt is somewhat silly, but then I want to clear it:)


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    #4

    Re: requesting more help on had

    When you say "I have had a good relationship ..." you need to give the idea of a time period, either explicitly or as implication.

    I've had a good relationship ... ever since/ since 2003/ for 5 years, etc.

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    #5

    Re: requesting more help on had

    Just today i came across something similar to above discussion. Just to get more clarity, I am again seeking your help in the following sentences, and please let me know the difference between the sentences that are posted juxtaposed:

    It has had many effects vs it has many effects

    We have growth of 20% per annum in the last few years vs We have had growth of 20% per annum in the last few years.

    He has had some trouble with his left knee vs He has some trouble with his left knee

    Also in the last sentence-- why wasn't the plural troubles used instead of a singular word trouble?

    Thanks in advance

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: requesting more help on had

    Quote Originally Posted by kiranlegend View Post
    Just today i came across something similar to above discussion. Just to get more clarity, I am again seeking your help in the following sentences, and please let me know the difference between the sentences that are posted juxtaposed:

    It has had many effects vs it has many effects

    We have growth of 20% per annum in the last few years vs We have had growth of 20% per annum in the last few years.

    He has had some trouble with his left knee vs He has some trouble with his left knee

    Also in the last sentence-- why wasn't the plural troubles used instead of a singular word trouble?

    Thanks in advance
    "It has had many effects." In the past it had effects which possibly continue to affect now, but maybe not.
    "It has many effects." The effects continue now.
    "He has had some trouble with his left knee." Maybe the trouble is continuing, maybe not.
    "He has some trouble with his left knee." He has the trouble now.

    One trouble, more than one, troubles.

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    #7

    Re: requesting more help on had

    Few more doubts on had:

    The judge looked panic-stricken and quickly muttered something into the private phone she had had installed in the event of an emergency.

    What difference does it make If I replaced the bolded part with had? What does the orginal sentence mean?

    Thanks,
    Kiran

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: requesting more help on had

    Quote Originally Posted by kiranlegend View Post
    Few more doubts on had:

    The judge looked panic-stricken and quickly muttered something into the private phone she had had installed in the event of an emergency.

    What difference does it make If I replaced the bolded part with had? What does the orginal sentence mean?

    Thanks,
    Kiran
    In the original sentence 'had had installed' means the phone that she had caused to be installed in the past.
    If you change it to 'had installed' it means the phone that was actually installed at that time.

    Look at it this way;
    'If I had a hammer, I would put a nail in the wall.' If I possessed a hammer. Present.
    'If I had had a hammer, I would have put a nail in the wall.' If I had possessed a hammer. Past.

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