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    #1

    Question Modal verbs in British English

    Hello
    How often is "have got to" used in British English?
    Is there any difference between "have got to" and "have to"?

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Modal verbs in British English

    Quote Originally Posted by 126 View Post
    Hello
    How often is "have got to" used in British English?
    Is there any difference between "have got to" and "have to"?
    "I have got to go to work now." "I have to go to work now." There is no difference in meaning between the two, in my opinion "got" is redundant here.

    As for how often it is used, probably too often would be my answer.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Modal verbs in British English

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    "I have got to go to work now." "I have to go to work now." There is no difference in meaning between the two, in my opinion "got" is redundant here.

    As for how often it is used, probably too often would be my answer.
    That depends on the context, and you have no basis for knowing what "here" means. The "redundant" got adds emphasis:

    Whether you win or lose, you have to try - you've just got to. In this example, you could say "you just have to" but the version with "got" sounds more emphatic to me - possibly because of the assimilation of the unvoiced "to"; what the insertion of "got" does is that it preserves the voicing of the "v" (not that many users would be aware of that).

    b

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Modal verbs in British English

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    That depends on the context, and you have no basis for knowing what "here" means. The "redundant" got adds emphasis:

    Whether you win or lose, you have to try - you've just got to. In this example, you could say "you just have to" but the version with "got" sounds more emphatic to me - possibly because of the assimilation of the unvoiced "to"; what the insertion of "got" does is that it preserves the voicing of the "v" (not that many users would be aware of that).

    b
    Yes, I appreciate that when used with the contraction "you've" it (sometimes) preserves the "v", often it comes out as "you got", and, in speech it flows better; "You've a bike." versus "You've got a bike." but with "you have" without contraction it is redundant, and moreover, when written it is completely redundant. By the way, for me "You just have to." sounds just as emphatic as "You've just got to." Also more elegant.
    Last edited by bhaisahab; 24-Aug-2008 at 20:19. Reason: afterthought


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    #5

    Re: Modal verbs in British English

    If they are not used as modals but as regular verbs meaning possession, there are some restrictions on "have got":

    1) It can't express a recurrent action.
    e.g. I have English classes on Mondays. (not "have got")

    2) It can't express a past action.
    e.g. I had a bike when I was ten. (not "had got")
    By the way, as a modal, it can't have past time reference either.
    I had to leave. ( not "I had got to leave")

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Modal verbs in British English

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Whether you win or lose, you have to try - you've just got to. In this example, you could say "you just have to" but the version with "got" sounds more emphatic to me - possibly because of the assimilation of the unvoiced "to"; what the insertion of "got" does is that it preserves the voicing of the "v" (not that many users would be aware of that).

    b
    Possibly also because you've expressed the concept in two ways, instead of just repeating the first way again.

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