Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Telugu
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 447
    #1

    what is a unconjugated verb?

    In English, the idiom is
    requiring x toy or requiring that x y, with x as the noun subject and y the unconjugated form of the verb.

    take -- unconjugated verb
    can take -- conjugated verb

    Is my above interpretation of conjugate verb correct?

    please help


  1. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #2

    Re: what is a unconjugated verb?

    Close - a 'conjugated' verb is a verb with a bit added or changed, to affect its grammar; another word for it would be 'bare infinitive'. So "take" is an unconjugated verb, and "took", "taken" or "takes" are unconjugated forms. I wouldn't call adding 'can' conjugating, but some teachers might. And, etymologically, many inflected verbs (ones with endings or changes that mark a change in grammatical function) turn out* to have been originally separate words added on.

    b

    * Etymological note, that can be safely ignored :
    The simple future in most Romance languages gives many examples: The first conjugation -abo endings of the Classical Latin future were replaced in Vulgar Latin by habere de <infinitive> - in Spanish, for example amabo -> hé de amar - in that case, "amar" was often replaced by "querer", so I'll switch to that version for the rest of the example - hé de querer -> quereré; (in medieval texts you can see a transitional form, with the future written as two words: <infinive> hé**). Both versions still exist today. The three-word so-called 'analytical' one is less common than the one-word future, but is used in some contexts - especially political rhetoric. I'll leave it to a native Spanish speaker to say more about this usage. My Spanish is "best before 1975" .

    **PS In Portuguese it's shown when a simple future (say acharei) has an object pronoun inserted: achá-lo-ei .
    Last edited by BobK; 25-Aug-2008 at 11:32. Reason: Metafootnote added

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Telugu
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 447
    #3

    Re: what is a unconjugated verb?

    Hehe. Wow:) Fortunately, as of now, I could get what I want :D

  2. ladybird987's Avatar

    • Join Date: Jul 2008
    • Posts: 110
    #4

    Re: what is a unconjugated verb?

    in ENglish it is difficult to explain conjugation as the word doesn't change in it.

    I would say: "(to) take" is as unconjugated as any other.
    A conjugated form would be then: "(I, you,...) take". But without marking the person you can't say what it is.
    There is no infinitive for "can". Or maybe there is one? The only logically possible form is "(to) be able". But when you conjugate this you get "I am able".


    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 810
    #5

    Re: what is a unconjugated verb?

    Quote Originally Posted by ladybird987 View Post
    in ENglish it is difficult to explain conjugation as the word doesn't change in it.

    I would say: "(to) take" is as unconjugated as any other.
    A conjugated form would be then: "(I, you,...) take". But without marking the person you can't say what it is.
    There is no infinitive for "can". Or maybe there is one? The only logically possible form is "(to) be able". But when you conjugate this you get "I am able".
    Can is a pure modal verb, it has no infinitive, and is not inflected in any way.

    The full infinitive to be plus the complement able, as you suggest, is a suitable replacement. It would just require the following verb to be a full rather than bare infinitve.

    I can take...

    I am able to take....


    As far as I am aware - the full infinitive (e.g. to take) is the unconjugated form of the English verb.

    I am not a teacher.

  3. ladybird987's Avatar

    • Join Date: Jul 2008
    • Posts: 110
    #6

    Re: what is a unconjugated verb?

    So, modal verbs: can, must, should (can you think of any other?) do not have infinite form.
    BTW, in Polish we have no infinite form for "powinno się" an equivalent for "should". All the others exsist.


    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 810
    #7

    Re: what is a unconjugated verb?

    Quote Originally Posted by ladybird987 View Post
    So, modal verbs: can, must, should (can you think of any other?) do not have infinite form.
    BTW, in Polish we have no infinite form for "powinno się" an equivalent for "should". All the others exsist.
    By comparison we have quite a few in English!

    Could, may, might, will and would are other examples.


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #8

    Re: what is a unconjugated verb?

    You probably guessed - and BobK will correct me if I'm wrong - but I think what his fingers meant to type was:

    So "take" is an unconjugated verb, and "took", "taken" or "takes" are conjugated forms.

  4. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #9

    Re: what is a unconjugated verb?

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    You probably guessed - and BobK will correct me if I'm wrong - but I think what his fingers meant to type was:

    So "take" is an unconjugated verb, and "took", "taken" or "takes" are conjugated forms.
    I'm lost Isn't that what I said? Anyway, time for bed :yawn:

    b

  5. ladybird987's Avatar

    • Join Date: Jul 2008
    • Posts: 110
    #10

    Re: what is a unconjugated verb?

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    You probably guessed - and BobK will correct me if I'm wrong - but I think what his fingers meant to type was:

    So "take" is an unconjugated verb, and "took", "taken" or "takes" are conjugated forms.
    Are they? Conjugation refers to personal forms
    I, you, he, she it, we, you, they.

    "took", and "taken" are temporal forms (tempus forms?) - it is not flexion.

    ----
    Then, one should distinguish: finite and infinite verb form. What do you think?

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] can u please tell me if its auxiliary verb or main verb?
    By asimrj in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 12-Mar-2009, 16:32
  2. Usage Of "does"
    By crool in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 09-Aug-2007, 16:56
  3. Verb or be plus adjective
    By krishna_ab in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-Mar-2006, 14:18
  4. verbs
    By eyescold_07 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-Aug-2005, 06:32
  5. noun phrases
    By sting in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 26-Aug-2004, 21:52

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •