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  1. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #1

    Smile assume the position=?

    Scenario:

    (The Simpsons were going to church one Sunday.)

    Marge: Kids! We're late for church. Get your butts down here right now!

    Lisa:Ready for inspection, Mom.

    Marge: Very nice, Maggie. And, Lisa, you look lovely.

    Marge: Bart, assume the position.

    (Bart put up his hands on the wall, and Marge searched him and found slings, etc.)

    Questions:

    What does 'assume the position' mean?

    assume = take?

    the position = put up hands on the wall?

    Is 'assume the position' a set phrase in the army?

    Thanks!

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: assume the position=?

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    ...

    Questions:

    What does 'assume the position' mean?

    assume = take?

    the position = put up hands on the wall?

    Is 'assume the position' a set phrase in the army?

    Thanks!
    I don't know about the army, but it's commonly used in crime fiction. It means 'get ready to be searched'.

    b

  3. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #3

    Smile Re: assume the position=?

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I don't know about the army, but it's commonly used in crime fiction. It means 'get ready to be searched'.

    b
    Hi BobK,

    Thank you for your answer.

    If a police officer say it to me, should I (1)turn back and (2) put up my hands on the wall?

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: assume the position=?

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    Hi BobK,

    Thank you for your answer.

    If a police officer say it to me, should I (1)turn back and (2) put up my hands on the wall?
    - or at least raise your hands; the important thing is to demonstrate that you're not putting up any resistance, so the details of position you adopt may vary. For example, if there's no wall nearby, you might put your hands on the bonnet of a car (leaning on something -> off balance -> no risk).

    b

  5. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #5

    Smile Re: assume the position=?

    BobK, thank you very much for your help.

  6. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: assume the position=?

    I should have corrected your 'turn back'. If you're walking in one direction and you turn back, you carry on walking, but in the opposite direction. What you meant here was 'turn round'. There is also the expression 'turn your back on <someone/thing>' - but this usually has a sense of rejection (by the person who does the turning); 'he turned his back on his friends'; 'We've been through so much together - you can't turn your back on me now'....

    b

  7. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #7

    Smile Re: assume the position=?

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I should have corrected your 'turn back'. If you're walking in one direction and you turn back, you carry on walking, but in the opposite direction. What you meant here was 'turn round'. There is also the expression 'turn your back on <someone/thing>' - but this usually has a sense of rejection (by the person who does the turning); 'he turned his back on his friends'; 'We've been through so much together - you can't turn your back on me now'....

    b
    Much obliged, BobK. I've understood.

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