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    #1

    I bear bad tidings

    In the sentence below, what does "I bear bad tidings" mean?

    I fear I bear bad tidings, my prince.

    It would be I bring bad news?

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: I bear bad tidings

    Quote Originally Posted by dilermando View Post
    In the sentence below, what does "I bear bad tidings" mean?

    I fear I bear bad tidings, my prince.

    It would be I bring bad news?
    Exactly, "I bring bad news."

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    #3

    Re: I bear bad tidings

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Exactly, "I bring bad news."
    Took time but I am getting a hang of it. I think I will learn English before I finish my doctoral thesis in algebra.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: I bear bad tidings

    We don't use "tidings" often, except around Christmas time - when phrases like 'tidings of comfort and joy' and 'glad tidings of great joy I bring' are spoken by children in Nativity plays throughout the West.

    A related word is still current in the fossil phrase 'Woe betide you' - which means something like "look out, nasty things may happen". But that phrase isn't likely to crop up in mathematical circles.

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    #5

    Re: I bear bad tidings

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    We don't use "tidings" often, except around Christmas time - when phrases like 'tidings of comfort and joy' and 'glad tidings of great joy I bring' are spoken by children in Nativity plays throughout the West.

    A related word is still current in the fossil phrase 'Woe betide you' - which means something like "look out, nasty things may happen". But that phrase isn't likely to crop up in mathematical circles.
    Hello BobK,

    You're an "encyclopedia alive". The sentence above is from a comic book, and it was Christmas time. No, it doesn't crop up in mathematical circles. You needn't know English in order to read mathematical papers. It is the same words all the time. Theorem, corollary, proposition, hence, therefore, bla bla ....
    I like to read comic books to relax.

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