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  1. enydia's Avatar

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    #1

    imperial or metric units?

    Hi, everyone.

    In UK, USA, Australia and Canada, which is more commonly used, imperial or metric unites?

    Thanks in advance.

    Enydia ^_^

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: imperial or metric units?

    In the UK, things are metric-ish. In the mid-'70s there was a government programme for metrication. It was not popular, and there were exceptions and/or 'accommodations' (for example, pubs still have pint glasses, but the standard contents are measured in ml). It's only recently that all petrol stations sell by the litre. There have been a string of interim conversions: miles per gallon , kilometres per litre...

    An exception was made for greengrocers, who until quite recently were permitted to sell in pounds and ounces. And as for large distances, people still talk in miles, although maps use kilometres. In the world of 'DIY' [=Do It Yourself] some objects are sold in a mixture of systems - chipboard, for example, is metric in depth and imperial in area (or the other way round, I'm not sure: it doesn't matter, because the metric equivalent is made to approximate to a very close Imperial equivalent - wood is often sold in 300 mm units [very nearly 1 foot].)

    I don't know in detail about the other countries: try Metrication - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    b


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    #3

    Re: imperial or metric units?

    When metrication became fashionable, metric bricks were introduced. They soon went out of production since the metric system is not based on human dimensions, and the metric brick was too wide to be picked up in one hand.

  3. enydia's Avatar

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    #4

    Re: imperial or metric units?

    Thank you, Teachers.

    When you native speakers say ton (t), does it usually refer to metric ton (mt) or imperial ton?

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: imperial or metric units?

    Quote Originally Posted by enydia View Post
    Thank you, Teachers.

    When you native speakers say ton (t), does it usually refer to metric ton (mt) or imperial ton?

    People (in the UK) usually distinguish between a "ton" (2240 lb) and a "tonne" (1000 kilograms). I think they pronounce the metric one /'tʌni:/ when they what to emphasize the precise measurement, but as the two quantities are so nearly equivalent (I don't know the precise conversion factor, but it's roughly 2.2lb=1kg - which is how sugar's sold in the UK) - so an imperial ton is almost exactly the weight of 1000 bags of sugar!

    b

  5. enydia's Avatar

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    #6

    Re: imperial or metric units?

    really complicated

  6. Raymott's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: imperial or metric units?

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    People (in the UK) usually distinguish between a "ton" (2240 lb) and a "tonne" (1000 kilograms). I think they pronounce the metric one /'tʌni:/ when they what to emphasize the precise measurement, but as the two quantities are so nearly equivalent (I don't know the precise conversion factor, but it's roughly 2.2lb=1kg - which is how sugar's sold in the UK) - so an imperial ton is almost exactly the weight of 1000 bags of sugar!

    b
    In AusE, tonne is pronounced /tɒn/. It rhymes with ôRon"

  7. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: imperial or metric units?

    Here in the US, our traditional measurements were threatened with being overtaken by the metric system during the 1970s. It was necessary for global business, we were told. For a year or two, they attempted to teach us millimeters and liters and such in school. But we stood strong and resisted. Today inches, feet, miles, gallons, and ounces are still the norm in the US. However, some major corporations use metrics for their specifications (for example, when I worked in the steel industry, General Motors and Volkswagen and a few other US companies gave their specifications in millimeters and metric tons, and I was forced to learn how to convert).

    To repsond to previous comments, in the US, "ton" is pronounced "tuhn." One ton equals 2000 pounds. One long ton, or metric ton, equals 2240 pounds.

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    #9

    Re: imperial or metric units?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    Here in the US, our traditional measurements were threatened with being overtaken by the metric system during the 1970s. It was necessary for global business, we were told. For a year or two, they attempted to teach us millimeters and liters and such in school. But we stood strong and resisted. Today inches, feet, miles, gallons, and ounces are still the norm in the US. However, some major corporations use metrics for their specifications (for example, when I worked in the steel industry, General Motors and Volkswagen and a few other US companies gave their specifications in millimeters and metric tons, and I was forced to learn how to convert).

    To repsond to previous comments, in the US, "ton" is pronounced "tuhn." One ton equals 2000 pounds. One long ton, or metric ton, equals 2240 pounds.
    why did the USA resist to a system that is based on the most natural of the numbers, the number of fingers and toes, the number 10? is there a component of national pride that doesn't want to admit that the metric system is a brilliant French invention? in Canada, fortunately the official system is the decimal one but regrettably a few traditionalists still exist.
    just a student.


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    #10

    Re: imperial or metric units?

    Quote Originally Posted by jctgf View Post
    why did the USA resist to a system that is based on the most natural of the numbers, the number of fingers and toes, the number 10? is there a component of national pride that doesn't want to admit that the metric system is a brilliant French invention? in Canada, fortunately the official system is the decimal one but regrettably a few traditionalists still exist.
    just a student.
    Th decimal system is based on a division of the circumference of the earth. Nothing to do with having ten fingers and toes.

    It s also completely unrelated to human measurements.

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