Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

    • Join Date: May 2007
    • Posts: 67
    #1

    the fuction of "of"

    Dear teacher

    What is the fuction or purpose of "of" in the following senstance

    All the business trip is hard, this one is of no exception

    can it be written as:

    All the business trip is hard, this one is no exception

    many thanks

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jan 2008
    • Posts: 2,944
    #2

    Re: the fuction of "of"

    All the business trip is hard, this one is of no exception

    one / is/ exception
    of / no

    preposition



    Suggestion:

    All business trips are difficult; this one is no exception

  1. beascarpetta's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Great Britain
      • Current Location:
      • Austria

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 2,331
    #3

    Re: the fuction of "of"

    All the business trips is hard, this one is of no exception
    I would suggest , since you obviously wanted to stress that all business trips are like that

    All business trips are hard and this one is no exception

    So you were right on target with the second option

    All business trips are hard and this one is no exception

    Hope this helps.
    beascarpetta

  2. engee30's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Apr 2006
    • Posts: 2,969
    #4

    Smile Re: the fuction of "of"

    Quote Originally Posted by knowwhat View Post
    Dear teacher

    What is the fuction or purpose of "of" in the following senstance

    All the business trip is hard, this one is of no exception

    can it be written as:

    All the business trip is hard, this one is no exception

    many thanks
    The preposition of is sometimes used for stating a feature that someone or something has; it gives the phrase an adjectival meaning:

    Every (single) business trip is hard, this one is of no exception (= isn't exceptional).



    • Join Date: May 2007
    • Posts: 67
    #5

    Re: the fuction of "of"

    Quote Originally Posted by engee30 View Post
    The preposition of is sometimes used for stating a feature that someone or something has; it gives the phrase an adjectival meaning:

    Every (single) business trip is hard, this one is of no exception (= isn't exceptional).


    Dear teacher

    I still dont understand. Could you elaborate it more? what do u mean by "stating a feature that someone or something has". Can you use some examples as an illustration?

    thanks

  3. engee30's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Apr 2006
    • Posts: 2,969
    #6

    Smile Re: the fuction of "of"

    Quote Originally Posted by knowwhat View Post
    Dear teacher

    I still dont understand. Could you elaborate it more? what do u mean by "stating a feature that someone or something has". Can you use some examples as an illustration?

    thanks
    If you wanted to say that somebody is charming, you could put it in this way:

    Charles's a very charming person. [attributive adjective]
    or
    Charles's such a charming person. [attributive adjective]
    or
    Charles's so charming. [predicative adjective]
    or
    Charles's a man of great charm. [prepositional phrase with adjectival meaning]

    The last sentence could be read like these - one of Charles' features/qualities is his charm; he has a lot of charm; he bears the quality of being charming.


  4. beascarpetta's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Great Britain
      • Current Location:
      • Austria

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 2,331
    #7

    Re: the fuction of "of"

    I wouldn't think you'd hear many people say "Every (single) business trip is hard, this one is of no exception"

    (no offence intended)

  5. engee30's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Apr 2006
    • Posts: 2,969
    #8

    Re: the fuction of "of"

    Quote Originally Posted by beascarpetta View Post
    I wouldn't think you'd hear many people say "Every (single) business trip is hard, this one is of no exception"

    (no offence intended)
    I do agree with you, but...

    (no offence taken)

  6. Newbie
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Croatian
      • Home Country:
      • Croatia
      • Current Location:
      • Croatia

    • Join Date: Aug 2008
    • Posts: 3
    #9

    Re: the fuction of "of"

    I'm not a teacher of English, but I love the way British English speakers complicate something that can be said with less words. ( I'm sory, should it be "with fewer words"?).
    I'm a Rowling fan, I think she uses those complications a lot and they sound just juicy to me.
    ( I see that "juicy complication" in phrase of no exception. )


    • Join Date: May 2007
    • Posts: 67
    #10

    Re: the fuction of "of"

    Quote Originally Posted by engee30 View Post
    If you wanted to say that somebody is charming, you could put it in this way:

    Charles's a very charming person. [attributive adjective]
    or
    Charles's such a charming person. [attributive adjective]
    or
    Charles's so charming. [predicative adjective]
    or
    Charles's a man of great charm. [prepositional phrase with adjectival meaning]

    The last sentence could be read like these - one of Charles' features/qualities is his charm; he has a lot of charm; he bears the quality of being charming.

    Dear teacher

    thanks for your detailed explanation

    my last question is, even though each of those 3 senstence are made up of different adjective pattern, do all have the same meaning as far as the emphasis goes

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Correct use of "of"
    By cocteau in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-Apr-2008, 10:56
  2. "in" or "of"
    By betterin in forum Teaching English
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 25-Jun-2007, 07:00
  3. "of" or no "of"
    By yppah in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-Nov-2006, 23:14
  4. Towns/villages and the "of" phrase
    By ewelina in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 06-Oct-2006, 16:26
  5. what is the meaning of "of"?
    By bigbook86 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 27-Aug-2006, 09:00

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •