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      • Native Language:
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    #1

    Smile fall/autumn

    What is more common in English, to describe the season when the leaves fall from the trees (I mean during a conversation), the word fall or autumn? For example, if I say Autumn season is my favourite, will I sound funny?

    I am asking this question because we are taught here is Brazil that the seasons are: autumn, spring, summer and winter, but I have never listen someone speaking in English the word autumn when refering to this season but they always use the word fall.
    Last edited by dilermando; 27-Aug-2008 at 15:40. Reason: incomplete question

  1. Rebel's Avatar

    • Join Date: Jun 2007
    • Posts: 127
    #2

    Re: fall/autumn

    My family was originally British. While I lived there I never heard anyone saying "fall". It was a long time ago, so it may have changed.

    The first time I heard "fall" meaning "autumn" I was quite surprised.

    Carole King singing "winter, spring, summer or fall" (I've got a friend).
    I thought, back then, that it was just an American thing.

    • Member Info
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    #3

    Re: fall/autumn

    I'm British and autumn is definitely the usual word in the Uk.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: fall/autumn

    Quote Originally Posted by jamiep View Post
    I'm British and autumn is definitely the usual word in the Uk.
    We'd never say "fall" to mean "autumn" in Australia. It's AmE (and possibly Canadian).
    If you use "autumn" you will always be understood.

  3. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: fall/autumn

    "Autumn" is univserally understood in English, but in the US, it sounds terribly formal. We call this season "Fall." I recall being in the UK and describing early October as "Fall" and being laughed at. Nevertheless, you'll find that in print and in conversation, "Fall" is the more common word. "Autumn" is the province of poets and literary types.

  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: fall/autumn

    I think I could go so far as to say that "fall" is never used in the UK, except possibly by expat Americans. Maybe Canadians, I couldn't say.

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